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Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith (Read 4,702 times)
Edith Grove
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Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Feb 27th, 2018 at 2:03pm
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LISTEN: Keith Richards talks UK tour, new Rolling Stones album and retirement



https://www.planetrock.com/news/rock-news/listen-keith-richards-talks-uk-tour-ne...
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Paranoid Android
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #1 - Feb 27th, 2018 at 7:37pm
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“I would say (the album progress) is something like [i]
‘half way to near the beginning!’
[/i]
Actually Mick and I are getting together tomorrow in New York for a few days to do a bit more work on it so it’s progressing as I speak.”

I wouldn’t mind doing a (‘Blue & Lonesome’) part two.”

Now that's encouraging.... Smiley Smiley Smiley


“I was really happy to find out we were playing back home,” Keith said. “I didn’t realise it was five years (since Glastonbury and Hyde Park) so it’s time to pick up the thread.”

Dear Keith...Contact your accountant...we are playing the UK...He Found out?? Isn't he part of the machine that decides these things?!?



Admitting that picking setlist songs from The Stones’ vast back catalogue is “like Solomon’s choice”, Keith explained that the band work on the setlist when they get into rehearsals.

C'mon Guys...Do ya wanna open with JJF or SMU?!? And remember...we must play TD in the 6th song slot...
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #2 - Feb 28th, 2018 at 5:21am
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Looks like I was right. They haven't been working on god damned anything.

B&L was the project, not a new album. I never bought the bullshit that they were working on a new album and decided to do some blues. It's too coincidental that they rented Knophler's vintage-minded studio.
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I LIVE FOR THE ROLLING STONES!
Registered: Aug 2003, Posts on the old board: 1120
Devoted Stones fan since time began. SMILE. THE ROLLING STONES ARE HERE.

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gimmekeef
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #3 - Feb 28th, 2018 at 10:44am
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I'm waiting for Ian's official word on this "no new album" back walk by Keith
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"Runnin Like A Cat In A Thunderstorm"
 
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #4 - Feb 28th, 2018 at 1:09pm
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They gave it up as a bad job. It was quite apparent when they put out a covers album instead (and put it out belatedly at that - a full year after they recorded it - by which time they'd finally figured out that a new record wasnt worth devoting time to).

If a band with three songwriters cant crank out 10-12 passable songs in a period of three years (which it'll be by the end of this year) after a gap of over a DECADE then its pretty obvious to anyone that the game's up. Whatever muse or creative spark they may have had has died.
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #5 - Feb 28th, 2018 at 1:51pm
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It's over.
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #6 - Feb 28th, 2018 at 2:34pm
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They're fairly cranking out the interviews this week. They must have something to promote.
Here's another Keith one from The Telegraph :


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/artists/keith-richards-reuniting-rolling-stone...

...

Keith Richards on reuniting the Rolling Stones and going sober: 'The drugs are so bland these days'



Neil McCormick, music critic
28 FEBRUARY 2018 • 7:25PM
Keith Richards hasn’t had a drink since Christmas. The legendarily hard-living rock and roll icon sounds almost reluctant to admit to sobriety. “I’m not saying I’m definitely off all of this stuff,” he protests. “In six months’ time, I might be on it again. But at the moment, for a couple of months, I haven’t touched it.” When I ask how he is finding abstinence, he chuckles ruefully. “It’s novel.”

The 74-year-old Rolling Stone still smokes incessantly and speaks as if his vocal cords are coated in thick layers of fur, but he insists that cigarettes and coffee are the only real vices he has left. He is impressively disdainful of the prescription drugs rife among a younger generation, such as Xanax and Percocet. “Drugs are not interesting these days. They are very institutionalised and bland. And, anyway, I’ve done ’em all.”

His laughter is rich, throaty and infectious, constantly bubbling up to shade his remarks with mischief. Richards has always been the Stones’ most entertaining conversationalist, brutally honest and quick-witted. On the recent spate of retirements of many of his musical contemporaries, he chortles: “More room for us!” On Sir Elton John’s announcement of a three-year farewell tour, he chuckles, “After three years on the road with Elton, you would want to retire, too. I’ll take his word for it.” Richards had a long feud with Elton (who once described him as “an a--hole” who looks like “a monkey with arthritis”). However, he is in a forgiving mood. “He’s a lovable old dear,” he says of him now. “He’s softening with age.” But on the question of whether he’ll miss Elton when he’s gone, he is unmoved. “Not at all.”

Asked what it would take to bring the Rolling Stones’ long run to an end, Richards is unequivocal: “Somebody keeling over.” Drummer Charlie Watts has claimed that it wouldn’t bother him if the Stones called it a day. But Richards insists there is no thought of retirement. “There’s never ever been a word about it muttered among ourselves. I guess the day’s obviously going to come, some day. But not in the near future. We’re all looking forward to doing what we’re doing, especially back in Blighty.”

What he’s referring to is the Stones’ upcoming stadium tour of Britain in the summer, their first UK shows since Glastonbury and Hyde Park in 2013, and their first tour in more than 10 years. “We’re playing home turf, so there’s a certain extra glow. But it’s always a pleasure to get up there again, especially with this band, man. I think the boys are playing better than ever. Maybe it’s experience, we seem to be able to pace ourselves right. I’m blessed to work with some of the best players ever. That never gets old.”

There is a new Stones album in the works, to follow their fantastic 2016 covers album, Blue & Lonesome. Richards is calling from a studio in New York, where he is awaiting the arrival of Mick Jagger to work on new songs. “Mick’s great, we’re getting on very well,” says Richards. “He’ll be here in half an hour and we’ll be sitting face to face, making music, like always.”

Jagger and Richards met as schoolboys in Fifties Dartford and have been the creative leaders and songwriting heart of the Stones since 1962. They haven’t always got along, though, and there was a particularly unpleasant schism following the publication of Richards’s acclaimed autobiography Life, in 2010, with its disparaging remarks about Jagger. For a while, it seemed touch and go whether the Stones would ever play together again. But the acclaim afforded their shows since getting back on the road in 2012 seems to have helped thaw relationships.

“Mick and I live off the fire between us,” says Richards, who is effusively warm about all of his band mates. “We were made for each other. It’s like putting on an old glove, man, you know.” They don’t hang out much between engagements. “We can stay away from each other, happily, for months. But it’s the gaps in between that make it more interesting. You come back fresher. When we do get together, we rehearse very hard, we soak ourselves in it.”

I have seen the Stones four times in recent years, and each show has been extraordinary, hitting the kind of sinuous heights that first established their claim to be the world’s greatest rock and roll band. When I ask if the relative sobriety of Richards and fellow guitarist Ronnie Wood has contributed to sharpened playing, Richards guffaws. “Well… all things are relative! Insobriety produced some amazing stuff, too!”

Richards’s personal favourite Stones period (“God, that’s hard, being asked to choose. That’s really like cutting the babies in half!”) is 1968-72. “Beggars Banquet, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers, Exile… we really hit the spot.”

That, of course, was also a period when Richards was becoming increasingly addicted to hard drugs, gaining a reputation as the most elegantly wasted human being on earth. The Stones in the Seventies ruled the roost during rock’s most notorious period of conspicuous debauchery. In the wake of the #MeToo movement shining a harsh light on the treatment of women in the entertainment industry, I wonder if Richards has any qualms about past behaviour. “You’d have to ask the ladies,” says Richards. “I’ve had no complaints.”

In fact, Richards has always been a bit of a one-woman man. He was with model and actress Anita Pallenberg for over 10 years (they have a son and daughter) and has been married to former model Patti Hansen for 34 years (they have two daughters). Pallenberg, one of the great loves of his life, died last year. “Miss her dearly,” he says, momentarily sombre, before suddenly laughing again. “Long may she not rest in peace, because she hates peace!”


With so many deaths and retirements among his contemporaries, it seems that the rock and roll era is coming to an end. Young guitar bands find it hard to thrive in the charts. Gibson guitar manufacturers were recently revealed to be on the verge of bankruptcy.

Richards remains optimistic, though. “I don’t think eras end, they sort of fold and meld into each other. If rock and roll is at an end, when was the beginning? It’s part of the blues, it’s built into the musical framework of the world. If we’re talking about fashion and all the other things, everything was rock for a while – you can’t expect that to go on forever. But we’ll see. We’re going to be playing to several million people in the coming months, so I wouldn’t call that dead.”

Richards doesn’t particularly keep up with new music (“Even as a kid, I never listened to what was pop, was always listening to old stuff”) but admires Lady Gaga, comparing her to Barbra Streisand, and Ed Sheeran, of whom he says: “Nice voice, nice songs.”

As for his views on his contemporaries, Quincy Jones recently disparaged the musicianship of the Beatles, the Stones’ great Sixties rivals, but Richards is not persuaded. “It was their songwriting which was the real apex of what they did, rather than their musicianship, which was definitely adequate,” he laughs, perhaps aware he is damning with faint praise. “Their vocal harmonies were very strong. Some very interesting stuff went on there. So without pooh-poohing our Quincy, leave Beatles alone, you know.”

Richards famously reads a lot of history books and listens to the blues, jazz and classical music. Does he keep up with politics and current affairs? “Well, it’s very difficult not to these days. They’ve got a president here that’s pretty funny. And I don’t mean ha ha.” Trump used a Rolling Stones song, You Can’t Always Get What You Want, on his campaign trail, continuing to walk out to it even after the Stones asked him to desist. “That’s about the level of the guy’s manners,” notes Richards, disparagingly.

Although Jagger was knighted in 2003, Richards has no expectations of joining him on the honours list. “My views are well known to the people that dole them out.” He denies there is anything malicious in his mockery of Sir Mick (and, for that matter, Sir Elton, Sir Paul, Sir Rod, Sir Cliff, Sir Tom and Sir Ray), though can’t resist adding, “I think it’s all a bit archaic. I thought Sirs were for doing some brave deed in battle, not singing songs.”

You get the sense that Richards really wants to be diplomatically positive about Jagger but is constantly undermined by an instinct for mischief. He praises Jagger’s strenuous approach to septuagenarian fitness but then adds, “I worry about his joints from all that jogging, man. But he gets along all right.” On his own fitness routine, he quips: “Well, I don’t like routines. If I find I’ve got one, I deliberately fall out of it.”

Despite all indications to the contrary, Richards and the Stones won’t go on forever. But he’s clearly determined to enjoy it while it lasts. “I do think the further along the line you go, and you realise you are enjoying it, you put more into it. Just the fact that we’re still honing it down, it’s a blast.”

He expects to keep playing until he drops and insists he doesn’t worry about when that day might come. “I never think about it. Never. I know loads of other people worry about it, and I let them concern themselves with it. Me, I’ll wait for it to happen.”

The Rolling Stones play five UK shows, starting with London Stadium on May 22. Tickets go on sale March 22; rollingstones.com
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #7 - Feb 28th, 2018 at 4:29pm
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And another interview - this time its the Wall Street Journal :


https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-wisdom-of-keith-richards-1519826136?emailToken=...

The Wisdom of Keith Richards

At 74, Keith Richards is still a style icon. And although he’s aware that at some point the music must stop, for now there’s a new album to finish and a tour to plan
By Alan Light
Feb. 28, 2018 8:55 a.m. ET



I AIN’T GONNA BE around forever—not even me!”



...

Keith Richards, photographed by Inez & Vinoodh, in his own jacket, T-shirt, hat and jewelry. PHOTO: INEZ & VINOODH FOR WSJ. MAGAZINE



The stuff scattered in front of him could be a Keith Richards starter kit: a pack of Marlboro Reds; playing cards, dominoes and a buck knife; stacks of CDs, including box sets of Mozart and Chuck Berry; and a copy of James Norman Hall’s 1940 story collection Doctor Dogbody’s Leg, in which a Royal Navy surgeon spins a series of tall tales about how he lost his leg during the Napoleonic Wars.

It’s a placid domestic scene for the most celebrated outlaw in rock ’n’ roll history—the swashbuckling “Keef” swigging from whiskey bottles, snorting and swallowing drugs that would kill a weaker man, running from the law, writing the “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” riff in his sleep; the earthshaking songwriter and musician who confirmed most of his infamous mythology in 2010’s best-selling, no-holds-barred memoir, Life . Writing the book almost wrecked him, he says, but it didn’t mark the end of the road. In fact, Richards claims that the group’s most recent performances—12 European stops last fall—were as good as they’ve ever been in the Stones’ unprecedented 56-year career. “I think the band is sounding better than it ever has,” he says. “Does it matter now? To us, it does.

“There’s a certain thing in this band, which I find really weird, is that they just want to do it. Some nights we’re better than others, of course, but all I know about this damn band is that they always want to make it better than the night before. And that’s one of the things that keeps us going. I actually wanted four or five more shows—it stopped just as we were peaking.” (The next tour starts in May, 11 shows kicking off in Ireland and followed by dates across the U.K. and Europe.)

Perhaps even more notable for the band’s multiple generations of fans, the Rolling Stones have been working on a new album off and on for more than two years (over that span, according to producer Don Was, they’ve spent about three weeks total in the studio). It would be their first record of original material since 2005’s A Bigger Bang. Richards seems pleased with the direction it’s headed, though he presents no real sense of urgency—he expects that by the time everyone regroups after the winter holidays, it will be months before they get back to work.

“I’m going to sound like Trump—‘It will happen; don’t worry about it’—but it’s in the early stages,” he says.​ “We have some stuff down, which is very interesting,” but he then adds that travel with their respective families during the winter holiday season means he and Mick Jagger will not be in contact for a while. “It’s more difficult for us to write together the further apart we are, but it also has its benefits in that we come back to it from a different angle.”

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SWAP MEET “I think most of the reason that people think I have style is because I wear my old lady’s clothes,” Richards says. “Patti and I wear the same size, so I take this one and this one.” Nili Lotan vest, $475, nililotan​.com, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello shirt, $990, Saint Laurent, 3 East 57th Street, New York.

Don Was, who has worked with the band since the ’90s, expresses enthusiasm over what they’ve done so far. “The songwriting that Keith and Mick did last year was really something to behold,” he says. “The three of us sat in a room, with them facing each other, five feet apart, with guitars, and there’s something magical that happens that’s still as fresh as when they started.”

Whether the Rolling Stones are recording or not, Richards says that his songwriter’s brain is always engaged. “Writing songs, you don’t get a minute off, not even to sleep,” he says. “You wake up in the middle of the night with a couple of notes in your head, and you’ve got to get out of bed and figure it out. It’s like being incontinent—either you’ve got to take a pee, or you’ve got to lay this little line down.

“So you get up, go to the piano or the guitar and hope it sticks. I don’t record shit. If I don’t remember it, it’s no good. I’ll wait for the wife or one of the daughters and see if they start to sing it without knowing it.”

He is well aware, though, that it’s a long way from the ’60s, when the Stones were chasing the Beatles up the pop charts and cranked out 13 top-10 U.K. singles (including eight No. 1s) in just over five years. “There was different pressure at that time,” he says. “You had to write a hit song every three months, which is a damn mill to go through. Now I have the pleasure and the luxury of taking as long as I like. I’ve got songs on the burner that are 15 years old. I’m still not satisfied with them.”

Richards pays minimal attention to pop music or new technology. “I don’t know if streaming isn’t just a speeded-up version of what we did with 45s,” he says. “That was pretty much the same rat race. You’ve got to say it all in two minutes and 30 seconds.”

‘I think the band is sounding better than it ever has. Does it matter? To us, it does.’

—Keith Richards



Among the new stars, Ed Sheeran gets his passing approval. Taylor Swift? “Good luck, girl—wish her well while it lasts.” But Richards adds that no one should take his thoughts on these matters too seriously. “I’ve just been around too long to be picking the bones out of kids,” he says. “It wouldn’t be fair of me, and I’ve always been an opinionated bastard anyway. And I never did really like pop music—even when I became pop music, I was listening to the blues and jazz and not interested in the hits.”

He does single out one younger performer from those who joined the Stones onstage during a U.S. tour a few years ago. “Lady Gaga’s good; she’s got real talent,” he says, comparing her to another recent favorite, Amy Winehouse. “Hey, if Tony Bennett likes her, how are you going to argue with Mr. Bennett?”

The Richards home, about an hour-or-so drive from Manhattan, sits behind two sets of gates; as you climb up the driveway, you pass various outbuildings before the main house rises out of the woods. Richards built the structure he’s referred to as Camelot Costalot in 1990, and it would be classified as a traditional, old-school Connecticut manor were it not painted in Mediterranean hues of orange, pink and blue.

Inside, the rooms are a range of dramatic colors. The walls are covered with photographs of Richards and supermodel Hansen at work, and many family portraits; in addition to the couple’s daughters, Theodora and Alexandra, Richards has a son, Marlon, and a daughter, Angela, from his relationship with the late Anita Pallenberg, and the clan now includes five grandchildren.

The house and three generations of Richardses are very much the center of his life today. “We’ve really gone into grandma and grandpa mode,” Hansen later tells me by phone. “It’s very relaxed. We love being in Connecticut, with each other, having the family around all the time and enjoying this time of our life.”

Though the last full-scale Rolling Stones tour, from 2005 to 2007, is the second-highest-grossing tour of all time (it was subsequently surpassed by U2), since then the band has structured its outings into shorter, more localized bursts—a few weeks at a time in South America or Europe or Australia. With these more manageable hops, whatever debauchery a Stones tour might conjure, both Richards and Hansen now talk about the road as an opportunity for them to be with each other.

“It’s more time with the old lady,” he says. “She’s always with me—‘I can’t let you out by yourself!’ I need all the support I can get, and the old lady is numero uno support.”

“It’s probably more fun now because it’s just Keith and me and the dog,” says Hansen. “The kids are all older, so we don’t have to deal with school and all that. Touring now is just time for us to be together.”

This bond between the couple even extends to Richards’s signature visual style, the ragged-but-right, heavily accessorized patchwork that inspired his friend Johnny Depp’s vision of Jack Sparrow’s attire for the Pirates of the Caribbean series, landed Richards a spot in a Louis Vuitton campaign and prompted designer Hedi Slimane to create an ensemble of “Keith” pieces for Saint Laurent. The guitarist offers a simple explanation for his look.


“I think most of the reason that people think I have style is because I wear my old lady’s clothes,” he says. “I’ve always done that—‘Oh, he’s so stylish!’ Patti and I wear the same size, so I take this one and this one.”

“Around the house, we’re always wearing each other’s pajamas, silks and satins and comfies,” says Hansen. “He’s definitely the flamboyant one in the family. He can make anything work—he finds a piece of ribbon lying around and knows what to do with it.”

Adorned with the famous skull ring, various bracelets and bangles, and a multicolored headband (though his thatch of hair, now gone fully white, is too thin to hold the trinkets and baubles that used to be braided into it), Richards denies giving too much thought to matters of fashion. “It’s totally unmanufactured; that’s the thing,” he says. “Improvisation—that is style, in all things. I honestly admit that I look to see what the other guys are wearing and wear the opposite. If they’re dressing up, I dress down. But I never thought about it; it was only other people that pointed out to me, ‘That’s a great look.’ So maybe style is unconscious.”

In the 21st century so far, Richards’s greatest accomplishment—maybe more than the music, though the latter-day Stones records tend to be underrated—was the publication of Life. Somehow the book (which he and author James Fox worked on for five years) managed to both enhance his reputation as the hardest-living, freest spirit in rock and also reveal the thoughtful, well-read man behind the myth. Reviews were ecstatic, it topped the New York Times bestseller list, and the audio version (read in part by Johnny Depp) was named audiobook of the year by the Audio Publishers Association. Life even received the prestigious Norman Mailer Prize for biography.

“Writing that book almost killed me, man,” says the author, lighting another cigarette. “By the time I’d gone through the entire career, I felt like I’d died twice. You don’t realize—you think, ‘Oh, yeah, I’ll tell you this, and then that happened, and dah dah dah,’ and at the same time, you actually relive it all yourself. It took me a couple of years to recover from that.”

“The book recalibrated a lot of people’s thinking about who he is,” says drummer Steve Jordan, who has worked with Richards since the ’80s and co-produced his last solo album, 2015’s Crosseyed Heart. “There’s such a preconceived notion about his persona—he’s been misrepresented for a long time, and the book gave a sense of what he’s really like and what a brilliant guy he is. I think he saw that he was appreciated, and that put him in a good place—he’s a lot more relaxed since then.”

“It took a big weight off his shoulders to get that done,” says Hansen. “It was very heart-wrenching, bringing all that up, and Keith doesn’t really like talking about himself.”

“I’m glad to get a lot off my chest, and I was amazed by the response that it got,” says Richards. “I like the way that it worked out. But it’s a hell of a thing trying to tell your story and still trying to protect your friends and neighbors at the same time.

“I could be really cute and say I’m thinking about a second one. But I ain’t gonna go through that again.”

IN DECEMBER 2015, the Rolling Stones went into British Grove Studios in London, a space in which they had never worked before, to start on the new album. “I knew Mick had a couple of songs, and I had a few,” says Richards. “But it was a new studio, so I called Ronnie Wood and I said, ‘Get down this Little Walter track called “Blue and Lonesome”—we’ll have that in our pocket in case the new stuff isn’t working out in the new room.’

“Sure enough, we get there and the new stuff is not working out in the new room—we’re still looking for the sound. So I said, ‘Ron, “Blue and Lonesome.” ’ Suddenly the room comes alive and we have a take. Then Mick turns around and says, ‘Let me try this Howlin’ Wolf one.’ And in five days, we’d cut the whole damn thing.”

The result was an album they titled Blue & Lonesome, the first time the Stones made an entire record dedicated to the Chicago blues that initially inspired them. The spirited, spontaneous performances captured a side of the band that many fans thought had long been lost, and it sold well (for a project so decisively not aimed at a pop market) and in January won a Grammy in the best traditional blues album category.

“The success of the blues album went beyond anyone’s expectations,” says co-producer Don Was. “I think it brought back an awareness that when they do something great, people really respond to it.”

“The blues record I’m really, really proud of,” says Richards. “It was something that had to be done—it took the Stones full circle. This is a f—ing blues band, and the height of our ambition was to be the best blues band in London. We were just trying to turn London on to the blues, and believe it or not, we turned America back on to the blues. Everything else is basically gravy, because we brought the music back from somewhere else and sent it back home.”

After the sessions, though, the music on Blue & Lonesome wasn’t the problem; the issue was convincing the lead singer that they should release it, which took several months. “Mick is a great performer, but can he pick the wrong ones,” says Richards, rolling his eyes. “He said, ‘Oh, we shouldn’t put out a blues album.’ So it took a bit of arm-bending. It’s funny when guys are so good at what they do—he’s a genius harp player, a genius blues singer. Because it just comes off of their hip like that, they think nothing of it. Talent is one thing; recognizing you’ve got it is another.”

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CROSSROADS “I’ve been so lucky,” Richards says. “I’m sure I’m going to pay in the next life. Hell is really going to be hell for me.” Additional styling, George Cortina; grooming, Tina Heart Montalbano; set design, Marla Weinhoff.  Nili Lotan vest, $475, nililotan​.com, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello shirt, $990, Saint Laurent, 3 East 57th Street, New York


The tension between Jagger and Richards is by now the stuff of rock ’n’ roll legend, and it seems it will follow them to their graves. “Mick’s a randy old bastard,” says Richards about his writing partner’s becoming a father for the eighth time just over a year ago, at age 73. “It’s time for the snip—you can’t be a father at that age. Those poor kids!”

As for the comments he made about Jagger in Life—such as calling his bandmate “unbearable” or mocking the sex symbol’s “tiny todger”—he has no regrets. “Mick and I would have spats anyway, no matter what I said in the book, and I left a lot out,” he says. But, he adds, “Mick and I live off of this fire between us.”

Mick and Keith—they’ve known each other practically their whole lives, and the contrasts are presented in terms that are almost Shakespearean: Mick is strategic, Keith is impulsive; Mick is the head, Keith is the heart. (“I read these things always,” Jagger once said, “ ‘Mick’s the one calculating; Keith’s passionate.’ But, I mean, I’m really passionate about getting things right.”) But from this friction comes the spark that drives the most definitive rock ’n’ roll band of all time.


“They’re two really different guys, and that’s what makes it so powerful,” says Was. “It’s like a rubber band pulled really tight. When you release it, it goes flying—that creative tension is what makes it so enduring. They understand that something special happens when the two of them get together. The cognizance of that magic that only comes from the two of them can be frustrating, but also really powerful.”

Whatever differences exist between the Glimmer Twins, whatever fights still arise five decades later, Richards makes his allegiance to his group crystal clear. “It’s been up- and downhill,” he says, “but if I’m talking about the Rolling Stones, there ain’t a frontman like Jagger. Don’t matter how many bones you want to pick out of him, he’s amazing to work with.

“I find it an interesting challenge to write for Mick,” he continues. “There’s no point in my giving him a song that’s beyond his range or that he’s not comfortable with. What I really like to do is write a song where Mick goes, ‘Yeah, right, I’m in!’ That’s what I try and do, because I’m writing for the lead singer of the Rolling f—ing Stones, and that is my job—to give him a riff that he leaps on and goes, ‘Right, I know what to do with this.’ ”

“Keith loves his band,” says Steve Jordan. “He’s very proud of his band; he feels it’s the best band in the world, and he’s still very committed to it. And I think he’s even better now. His writing keeps evolving, and that’s what you hope for when you’re an artist.”

No band has lasted as long as the Rolling Stones. Every day they go on, they are creating a new blueprint. In the late ’80s, their record-breaking concerts behind the Steel Wheels album were widely mocked as the “Steel Wheelchairs” tour; incredibly, that jaunt now falls in the first half of their career.

Richards thinks about how it all started, when he was just a kid dreaming of getting out of his London suburb. “I had no idea I was a songwriter,” he says. “I wasn’t sitting down and trying to be Gershwin. I can’t read a note of music. It’s all in the ears and from the heart—that’s all it is. I can’t believe I pulled it off, really.

“I’ve been so lucky, I don’t believe it,” he continues. “I’m sure I’m going to pay in the next life. Hell is really going to be hell for me. I don’t know why I’ve been given all this. You couldn’t dream it up, man, you couldn’t write it.”

And soon, back to work. More shows to play, more songs to chase. The Rolling Stones must go on, for the generation that grew up with them and the generations that don’t know a world without them.

“Now, there’s the air that you breathe, there’s the water you drink, and there’s the f—ing Rolling Stones,” says Richards. “We’ve been here forever—that’s the weirdest thing, ‘Oh, they’ve always been there.’ Wait till they’re gone, pal.”

Appears in the March 10, 2018, print edition. The online version of this article was updated after press time to include the Rolling Stones’ recent announcement of tour dates.

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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #9 - Feb 28th, 2018 at 4:57pm
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Gazza wrote on Feb 28th, 2018 at 4:41pm:



Damn! Is there any precedent for a public apology such as this amongst the Stones ?
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #10 - Mar 1st, 2018 at 5:34am
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For whatever reason, these interviews depress me. Too much talk about the end and death. Coupled with the truth that there really is no new music, the recycled tour name and apologies, it's just bumming me out. I want creativity from these guys.

I hope Keith remains sober. That's good news.
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Devoted Stones fan since time began. SMILE. THE ROLLING STONES ARE HERE.

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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #11 - Mar 1st, 2018 at 6:37am
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Gazza wrote on Feb 28th, 2018 at 1:09pm:
a band with three songwriters cant crank out 10-12 passable songs



after all...isnt that we all really just want...no more filler and waste of time...
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #13 - Mar 1st, 2018 at 11:50am
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Edith Grove wrote on Feb 28th, 2018 at 4:57pm:
Gazza wrote on Feb 28th, 2018 at 4:41pm:



Damn! Is there any precedent for a public apology such as this amongst the Stones ?


Amazing isnt it, considering what hes said in the past?  I actually had to read through the article again to see what he was referring to, as I found it so inconsequential at first.

Makes you really wonder how much humble pie Keith had to eat after Todgergate for Mick to agree to work with him again if he's going to be so keen to apologise for something like this.
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #14 - Mar 2nd, 2018 at 8:04am
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Although he happens to be correct, Keith seems to be the one who is always starting these things. Either he wants the attention or he has a deep anger at Mick for something (Anita, She's the Boss, God knows what it is), or most likely both. It's interesting, for someone whose kids seem to be so close to Mick's, he does say a lot of nasty things that probably hurt all the kids, not just Mick's.
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #15 - Mar 2nd, 2018 at 8:26am
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It's interesting how they've come full circle. Started their career doing blues covers, may end it doing the same.

Unless it's new music, I honestly wouldn't mind Blue & Lonesome being the last. It really does create a perfect circle. The band really went back to their real roots as a blues & RB cover band with that record.

If they're gonna give me another Voodoo Lounge it can still in the vaults. If they do another album I kinda want to hear them experiment with new sounds and be daring, dirty, vicious and unique again. Be the Stones being adventurous, not the Stones being a tribute act to themselves musically.

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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #16 - Mar 2nd, 2018 at 8:51am
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sorry wrong thread
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #17 - Mar 2nd, 2018 at 11:49am
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The Wick wrote on Mar 2nd, 2018 at 8:04am:
Although he happens to be correct, Keith seems to be the one who is always starting these things.



I guess we now all know the origin of the name...Keith has "NO FILTER"
So long sucker
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #18 - Mar 11th, 2018 at 9:15am
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what up?
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #19 - Mar 25th, 2018 at 8:22am
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Ronnie tweeted some footage of himself in the studio (could be British Grove in London, it appears)

A bass overdub by the look of things


https://twitter.com/ronniewood/status/977328464087760896
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #20 - Mar 25th, 2018 at 9:48am
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Gazza wrote on Mar 25th, 2018 at 8:22am:
Ronnie tweeted some footage of himself in the studio (could be British Grove in London, it appears)

A bass overdub by the look of things


https://twitter.com/ronniewood/status/977328464087760896


rehearsing start me up for upcoming shows.
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #21 - Mar 25th, 2018 at 11:56am
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Some Guy wrote on Mar 25th, 2018 at 9:48am:
Gazza wrote on Mar 25th, 2018 at 8:22am:
Ronnie tweeted some footage of himself in the studio (could be British Grove in London, it appears)

A bass overdub by the look of things


https://twitter.com/ronniewood/status/977328464087760896


rehearsing start me up for upcoming shows.


If thats the case, I really hope Keith was there too. Those tricky three notes at the start are quite a challenge.
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #22 - Mar 25th, 2018 at 4:15pm
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Gazza wrote on Mar 25th, 2018 at 11:56am:
Some Guy wrote on Mar 25th, 2018 at 9:48am:
rehearsing start me up for upcoming shows.


Those tricky three notes at the start are quite a challenge.



Oh no! not you again
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #23 - Mar 25th, 2018 at 5:05pm
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Edith Grove wrote on Mar 25th, 2018 at 4:15pm:
Gazza wrote on Mar 25th, 2018 at 11:56am:
Some Guy wrote on Mar 25th, 2018 at 9:48am:
rehearsing start me up for upcoming shows.


Those tricky three notes at the start are quite a challenge.



Oh no! not you again


Stones Inc. does not like us.
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Re: Album due by Christmas and other heavily vetted tour news spoken (coherently) by Keith
Reply #24 - Mar 27th, 2018 at 2:32pm
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Hopefully they will all be in Nashy together and have a chin-wag about their upcoming Xmas album 'Tighter Trousers'
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