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Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside (Read 445,953 times)
Some Guy
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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4500 - Sep 4th, 2019 at 8:41am
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What about Dorian?

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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4501 - Sep 4th, 2019 at 10:47am
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4502 - Sep 4th, 2019 at 10:52am
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Some Guy wrote on Sep 4th, 2019 at 8:41am:
What about Dorian?

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All updates are being sent asap to Golf Cart One as we speak.....
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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4503 - Sep 4th, 2019 at 9:14pm
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<  ---------- Some Guy  ?!   .......... !!!!!!!!!!! :







https://www.cnbc.com/2019/09/05/china-insiders-hint-this-round-of-trade-talks-co...






" Reliable China insiders hint that this round of trade talks could lead to a ‘breakthrough’ .  "








" The previous 18 months of trade talks between the U.S. and China have only led to more tit-for-tat tariffs, but this time it might be different, according to Chinese sources who seem to have inside knowledge on the trade war.

China’s Ministry of Commerce confirmed the two countries held a phone call Thursday and agreed to meet in early October in Washington. This would mark the 13th round of trade negotiations after both sides slapping tariffs on billions of dollars worth of each other’s goods.


“There’s more possibility of a breakthrough between the two sides,” said Hu Xijin in a tweet Thursday. Hu is editor-in-chief of the Global Times, a tabloid under the People’s Daily, which is the official newspaper of the Communist Party of China. His Twitter account has been followed by many Wall Street traders and market participants for insight on the trade war.

Hu has been spot on with the recent developments in the escalated trade war. Most recently, he had warned about the Chinese retaliation against President Donald Trump’s tariffs just hours before the Chinese made the official announcement.

A blog called Taoran Notes on Chinese social media WeChat has been followed by analysts covering China and market participants for cues on the trade battle. Run by a state-owned newspaper called Economic Daily, the blog has been cited by U.S. media including Bloomberg News for additional color from the China side.

On Thursday, in a 1,200-word commentary, Taoran said it’s “very likely” there will be “new developments” in the upcoming trade talks.

The blog highlighted the statement from China’s Ministry of Commerce saying both sides will make consultations in mid-September in preparation for “meaningful progress” in the ministerial-level talks in October. “Meaningful progress” is an expression that hasn’t been used at all since the talks in May fell apart, Taoran noted.

“Whether the trade war is headed in a positive direction or it will repeat again, I am afraid it still depends on how some people choose,” Taoran said.

Taoran first grabbed the attention of China observers when it emerged as the only vocal commentator on Trump’s initial threat to escalate the trade war back in May. “There’s no winner in a trade war,” Taoran warned then.

The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Hu and Taoran’s posts Thursday.

Dow futures pointed to a big gain for the market as investors bet that there may be something more substantial to come out of these new talks. "
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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4504 - Sep 4th, 2019 at 9:25pm
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<  -------------- Don Vito Andolini Corleone and Don Emilio "The Wolf"   .....   "  THE WOLF !!!! "   Barzini   :













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Reply #4505 - Sep 4th, 2019 at 9:32pm
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<  ----------------- GIMMEKEEF   ?!   ....... !!!!!!!!!!   :







https://www.arcamax.com/politics/mod/davidignatius/s-2270897







" Why America is losing the information war with Russia . "

David Ignatius on Sep 4, 2019








" WASHINGTON -- Richard Stengel, a former Time editor who became the State Department's undersecretary for public diplomacy, writes that he was once an information "idealist." He believed that in the marketplace of ideas, the truth would ultimately prevail. Not anymore.

"I think we all now know that this is a pipe dream," writes Stengel in a disturbing memoir of his three years on the communications firing line. "Unfortunately, facts don't come highlighted in yellow. A false sentence reads the same as a true one. It's not enough to battle falsehood with truth; the truth does not always win."

This book carries a blunt and frightening message: America is losing the fight for what Russians call the "information space." The cruel paradox of the internet, once hailed as a liberating force, is that it empowers governments that control information and enfeebles those that let it run free.

Stengel's account, which will be published in October, is titled "Information Wars: How We Lost the Global Battle Against Disinformation and What We Can Do About It." Unfortunately, the first half of the subtitle is more convincing than the second. This is a tale of how government bureaucracy, inertia and, most of all, the inherent constraints of an open, democratic society made America so vulnerable to covert action via the internet.

"Let's face it, democracies are not very good at combating disinformation," writes Stengel. Authoritarian governments, in contrast, "have gone from fearing the flow of information to exploiting it. They understand that the same tools that spread democracy can engineer its undoing."

Stengel was Time's managing editor and a widely respected journalist, so when he joined the Obama administration in 2014 to oversee State Department communications, it looked like laudable risk-taking on both sides. His mandate was to combat anti-American messaging. But it proved to be a case study in why government doesn't work.

"I found government too big, too slow, too bureaucratic. It constantly gets in its own way," he writes. "The dream of an outsider coming in to reform government is just that -- a dream."

When Stengel took his job, the big challenge was countering extremist messaging from what became the Islamic State. It's a painful story. State had a unit called the Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications, which had been established by Secretary Hillary Clinton in 2010. "From the moment of its birth, CSCC was a problem child," Stengel writes, underfunded, misunderstood and mistrusted by the bureaucracy.

While the Islamic State rampaged online, CSCC deliberated. Tasks that should have taken weeks instead took months. Other agencies undermined anything that threatened their turf. During one long meeting, a lieutenant general whispered to Stengel: "I know how to defeat ISIS. ... Get them involved in the interagency process."

Stengel frankly admits that the Obama administration was slow to react to Russia's 2016 election manipulation. "The scale of Russian disinformation was beyond what we were capable of responding to," he writes. He notes the eerie similarity between Russian covert propaganda and Donald Trump's campaign themes.

But he's skeptical that Russian intervention was decisive in 2016. "To this day, I'm not sure what impact it had," he writes. "Russian messaging had a lot of reach but hardly any depth." And he includes this memorable zinger: "By televising hundreds of hours of Trump's campaign speeches, CNN did a whole lot more to elect him than Russia Today did."

Stengel documents our vulnerability to manipulation, foreign and domestic. But in analyzing what to do about democracy's weakness, he offers only a limited menu. He argues that Facebook and other social-media companies should be treated more like publishers -- and retain their immunity from liability suits only if they work to delete false or harmful content. Similarly, he wants to compel search engines to explain their algorithms for displaying content.

"I don't believe government is the answer," Stengel writes ruefully. He argues for self-regulation of the ecosystem on which journalists and advertisers both depend. He lauds the growth of news-rating systems, and the use of artificial intelligence to detect and delete false content; and he urges news organizations to avoid mindless "clickbait" and "sponsored content" designed to simulate news.

"Information Wars" ought to be a wake-up call. The message is that open, democratic societies are in retreat. There's only one force powerful enough to save the day (one too little mentioned these days), and that's the readers and viewers who consume information. Their choices are decisive.

In the end, people will get the news media they deserve: If they consume false information, they're certain to get more of it. "











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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4506 - Sep 10th, 2019 at 8:58pm
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<  ------------ GimmeKeef  ?!  ..... !!!!!!!!!!!! ;





https://www.arcamax.com/politics/mod/davidignatius/s-2271736






" Trump's personal diplomacy in China is no substitute for clear policy . "


David Ignatius on Sep 6, 2019




" WASHINGTON -- As we move into the fall, there's one overriding foreign-policy priority for America: Find a strategy to deal with a rising China that protects U.S. interests but doesn't subvert the global economy.

China is the challenge of our time, and the risks of getting it wrong are enormous. Huawei, the Shenzen-based communications powerhouse, argues in a slick new YouTube video that its critics want to create a new Berlin Wall. That's not true -- Huawei and other Chinese tech companies have allegedly been stealing intellectual property for years and are finally being held accountable -- but there's a real danger that America will talk itself into a digital Cold War that lasts for decades.

We're at a crossroads: At a conference on U.S.-China relations last month at the University of California, San Diego, a Chinese participant offered a blunt prediction about the future: "We think we are heading toward a partial decoupling of our relationship." Trump administration officials argue that China has been decoupling itself -- denying access to Western firms, even as America and its allies provided technology, training and market access.

But what comes next? Trump administration officials hope that progress toward a trade deal may happen at last, now that a meeting with a senior Chinese official has been set for October. But Myron Brilliant, who runs the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's international programs, cautions, "There's a trust deficit between Washington and Beijing that needs to be restored before there's progress."

President Trump reiterated Wednesday that the administration plans to deny Huawei access to American technology. "It's a national security concern," Trump told reporters at the White House. "Huawei is a big concern of our military, of our intelligence agencies, and we are not doing business with Huawei." That leaves a little wiggle room, but not much.

White House officials tell me the Chinese are mistaken if they think the administration is seeking to cripple China technologically. Officials say their goal isn't a rerun of the anti-Soviet strategy of containment, but something more flexible. One administration official says his colleagues sometimes refer to this still-unnamed strategy simply as "the noun."

The Trump administration's problem is that it has gutted the national security process that could devise a systematic plan for dealing with China. Instead, policy is highly personalized, and shaped by Trump's erratic decision-making style. "President Trump is our desk officer on China," says Michael Pillsbury, an informal White House adviser on Asia policy. Strange as it sounds, that's probably accurate.

This administration's sharp policy debates on China strategy are exacerbated because there's no decision-making process to resolve them. On one side are China hawks like White House adviser Peter Navarro; on the other are would-be deal-makers like Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. In the middle is Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who seems to have an instinct for where Trump will eventually land.

"On no issue is the lack of a policy process more visible or dramatic than China," says Kurt Campbell, who oversaw Asia policy in the Obama administration. He contrasts how the presidents of the world's two superpowers spent the last weeks of summer. President Xi Jinping met with top party officials at a beach resort and emerged with a new honorific, the "People's Leader." Trump spent those weeks in very public and sometimes self-destructive Twitter barrages, at home and abroad.

Trump has a simple four-word summary of his China baseline, notes one administration official: "Xi is my friend." Personal diplomacy has its uses, but it's no substitute for clear policy.

Framing a real China strategy should be Job 1 for Trump (and his successor in 2021, if he's defeated). Pillsbury described the scope of the challenge in the title of his 2016 book, "The Hundred-Year Marathon." He told me this week: "We need to change the trajectory that we're on now. That means running faster and slowing them down." That's a good formulation, but both goals require disciplined U.S. policy, something in short supply.

Making good decisions about China (and, implicitly, about the future of global technology) requires a sound U.S. policymaking structure. The best idea I've heard is a bipartisan bill introduced this year by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., to create a new "Office of Critical Technologies and Security" to oversee decisions about China and other key countries.

Trump was right to take the China trade and technology problem more seriously than his predecessors. But the time for Twitter diplomacy and deals with "my friend" Xi is over. U.S. moves on this chessboard should be guided by clear planning, not whim.










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Reply #4507 - Sep 10th, 2019 at 9:07pm
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Reply #4508 - Sep 10th, 2019 at 9:13pm
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<  ------------- Some Guy   ?!  ..... !!!!!!!!!!!!!!  :






https://www.arcamax.com/politics/mod/davidignatius/s-2273388





" Score one for American diplomacy . "

David Ignatius on Sep 10, 2019







" WASHINGTON -- Six weeks ago, Turkey was threatening to invade the Kurdish region of northeast Syria. Last Sunday, U.S. and Turkish troops instead conducted their first joint ground patrol of that area, with Kurdish cooperation. Score one for American diplomacy, backed by patient U.S. military power.

President Trump had said last December that he wanted to withdraw a Special Operations task force that had been assisting the Syrian Kurds in fighting the Islamic State. But many months later, part of that U.S. force remains in place, helping stabilize the region at relatively low cost.

"America is playing the role of mediator between us and the Turks," Gen. Mazloum Abdi, the commander of the Kurdish-led militia known as the Syrian Democratic Forces, told me in a phone interview last weekend, a few hours before the first U.S.-Turkish joint patrol began. "We know that the Americans are addressing Turkish concerns" about border security, he said. In return, the Kurds want "coordination that will be beneficial for all sides."

To forestall a threatened Turkish invasion, Mazloum agreed on Aug. 7 to a plan developed by U.S. special envoy James Jeffrey for a "safe zone" south of the Turkish border. Mazloum said that his forces have withdrawn from a border strip that ranges from 5 to 14 kilometers, across a swath of northeast Syria. In addition, the SDF has withdrawn its heavy weapons at least 20 kilometers from the border so that they don't threaten Turkey.

Many complications remain, and like most diplomatic efforts in the Middle East, this one is still a work in progress. Mazloum protests that the Turks have been conducting unilateral surveillance flights with drones and aircraft, endangering coalition forces. The Turks complain that the Kurds are building new fortifications within the zone, which Mazloum told me are simply shelters for Kurdish civilians in case of future attacks.

The United States had hoped to delay the first joint patrol until U.S. and Turkish units had worked together longer, and a local security force that could replace the SDF had been trained. But Turkey wanted to launch the joint operation last Sunday, so forces were apparently moved into the zone from the Manbij area, where similar U.S.-Turkish cooperation has been underway for months.

The deeper impasse is still there, even as U.S. officials work around the edges. Turkey doesn't like the idea of even indirect contact with Mazloum's 70,000-person militia, regarding the SDF as controlled by the YPG militia, which it regards as a terrorist group. Even after the first U.S.-Turkish joint patrol of the zone apparently succeeded, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan thundered that if the SDF doesn't leave the zone entirely by the end of September, "Turkey has no choice but to set out on its own," seemingly renewing the invasion threat.

"It seems Turkey's ally [the U.S.] is after a safe zone in northern Syria not for Turkey but for the terrorist group. We reject such an approach," Erdogan said.

But despite Erdogan's rhetoric, and Trump's insistence last December that he would pull out U.S. troops, the zone has been established and seems to be holding, with continued American military support. "We are hoping that this process will normalize the situation in our area and impact the process" for an overall political settlement in Syria that would eventually draw the northeast into a reorganized Syrian government, Mazloum told me.

What's striking, talking to Mazloum, is his calm. Flanked by two volcanic personalities, Trump and Erdogan, the Kurdish leader remains a quiet, seemingly emotionless commander. When I asked whether he still trusted the United States after the roller-coaster of Trump's troop-withdrawal announcements, he answered simply: "We're still working together."








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Reply #4509 - Sep 10th, 2019 at 9:28pm
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<  --------------  Throwback Wednesday  .   Reliving that Wonderful Day when  " Trump's Angels  "  (  ' Trump's WSJ [ .... soon to be joining the NY TIMES ! ]  Angels '  )   witnessed that EXACT moment when The United States Congress authoritatively certified  President Donald J. Trump's Electoral College Victory officially confirming The Great Leader as our Nation's 45th President of these United States   ...... Emotional  :   






" U.S. Congress certifies Trump's Electoral College victory . "







https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-congress-idUSKBN14Q25R








" WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Congress on Friday certified the Electoral College vote that gave Republican Donald Trump his victory in the contentious 2016 presidential election after a raucous half-hour joint session punctuated by Democratic challenges.

The Republican businessman, whose presidential campaign was his first bid for public office, garnered 304 electoral votes, compared with 227 won by his Democratic challenger, Hillary Clinton, according to the vote tally read by Vice President Joe Biden. "




https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D4ObA2GWwAED6wy.jpg



https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D4OWqy1W4AAnIez.jpg






[ Trump's  ' now the NY TIMES ' Angels  :  Angel Nicole Hong  ,  Angel Rebecca Ballhaus  (  Pronounced  ' Ball House  '   ) and Angel Rebecca Davis O'Brien  ]  : 



https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D4OBMDeWwAE0HHg.jpg




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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4510 - Sep 11th, 2019 at 9:38pm
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<  ---------- Some Guy  ?!   .... !!!!!!!!!!! :








https://tribunecontentagency.com/article/a-theory-on-why-trumps-gop-approval-rat
ing-the-real-one-is-so-high/







" A theory on why Trump’s GOP approval rating (the real one) is so high . "



JONAH GOLDBERG SEPTEMBER 11, 2019









" Early Monday morning, Donald Trump tweeted: “94% Approval Rating in the Republican Party, a record. Thank you!”

Where the president got this specific number remains a mystery. Recent polls by YouGov put his GOP approval roughly 10 points lower, and Gallup, which has tracked Trump’s popularity since he took office, puts him at 88 percent.

But I suppose we shouldn’t be surprised that Trump used his Sharpie to round up his score. He’s deeply invested in being — or at least claiming to be — the most popular Republican president in history. In July of 2018, he announced: “I am the most popular person in the history” of the GOP. “Beating Lincoln,” Trump added. “I beat our Honest Abe.”

For what it’s worth, polling in the 1860s wasn’t exactly reliable. But even if Trump’s oft-repeated 94 percent number were accurate, and even if it beat Lincoln’s ratings, it still wouldn’t beat George W. Bush’s 99 percent after the Sept. 11 attacks.

Why the president feels the need to embellish is already a well-spelunked psychological rabbit hole. But even ignoring his exaggerations, he is consistently hitting in the mid- to high 80s with Republicans in polling, which demands a question: Why are his actual numbers so high?

George W. Bush’s 99 percent might offer some insight. Americans generally rally around a president during a war or national crisis. But members of the president’s own party in particular can be counted on to fall in line.

The Atlantic’s Ronald Brownstein argues that the key to understanding the president’s standing with Republicans is that Trump is behaving like a wartime president, but the enemy is “Blue America.” Trump’s almost daily references to “treason” and enemies of the people may be driven by his own narcissism and persecution complex, but they resonate with a share of the electorate that believes the cultural war really is tantamount to a cold civil war.

While Trump has made it worse, this dynamic is not new. He is more the beneficiary (and exacerbator) of the polarized landscape than the creator of it. Party identification has been declining for Democrats and Republicans alike, but for those who cling to the label, the label has more meaning than it used to.

Until around 2000, it was normal for self-identified Republicans and Democrats to criticize presidents of their own parties, because people didn’t cling to partisan identity nearly as fiercely. The Bill Clinton impeachment battle was a foretaste of where we are. But even during the polarized presidency of George W. Bush, partisan dissent and defections were fairly common. Existential partisanship intensified under Barack Obama’s presidency, on both the right and left.

The wartime atmosphere Trump has established encourages partisans to overlook faults with their own side more than ever, because in the zero-sum logic of war, any dissent is seen as providing aid and comfort to enemies who would be worse if they gained power. Perhaps counterintuitively, Trump’s myriad and manifest flaws actually intensify the effect. The need to justify your support makes it impossible to acknowledge any shortcomings at all. When Stuart Varney of Fox Business recently refused to admit that Trump ever lies, it was as if he understood that once you pull that thread a little, there’s no telling where the unraveling will stop.

The irony is that the need to provide unwavering support for the president of your party is a direct function of the unwavering hostility from the president’s critics. This is why polls may not be as reflective of reality as we often think. If you talk to pollsters, they will tell you that many voters understand how polls can be used as weapons and don’t want to give the “enemy” any satisfaction.

Indeed, as I’ve argued before, there’s a rough parallel with Republican support for Bush during the Iraq War. Many Republicans knew that the war wasn’t going well but nonetheless supported Bush because he was a wartime president and they loathed his critics more than they disapproved of his performance. They’d be damned if they were going to give some pollster ammunition against the commander in chief. A similar dynamic explains Obama’s rock-solid support among Democrats. They hated — or feared — Obama’s enemies too much to abandon him, even if they had misgivings about him.

Both examples may shed some light on what’s in store for Trump in the future. Support for Bush and the war alike started to plummet as he headed for the exit. One of the defining currents of the Democratic primaries is the base’s disappointment with Obama’s accomplishments, even as his personal approval remains high.

It may be that once Trump is no longer the commander in chief in the war against Blue America, the ardor of his troops will give way to a better understanding of the price the GOP paid on his watch. "



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Reply #4511 - Sep 12th, 2019 at 8:48am
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The more I read about politics and the more I read this thread, the more I like the Rolling Stones
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I only get my rocks off while I'm sleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeping with your girlfriend!!
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Reply #4512 - Sep 15th, 2019 at 11:16am
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“Whether you like me or not, it doesn’t matter, You have to elect me. You have no choice.”


https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/461259-trump-to-republicans-whether-
you-like-me-or-not-it-doesnt-matter
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Reply #4513 - Sep 15th, 2019 at 11:25am
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...


President Donald Trump on Saturday offered U.S. support for Saudi Arabia’s self-defense in a phone call hours after drone strikes left swaths of Saudi oil fields aflame and disrupted global energy production.

Two sites, including the world’s largest oil processing facility and a massive Saudi oil field, were hit by explosives, leaving a smoke trail reportedly visible from space.

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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4514 - Sep 15th, 2019 at 11:34am
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Some Guy wrote on Sep 15th, 2019 at 11:16am:
“Whether you like me or not, it doesn’t matter, You have to elect me. You have no choice.”


https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/461259-trump-to-republicans-whether-
you-like-me-or-not-it-doesnt-matter




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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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<  ----------------   Some Guy   ?!  ............ !!!!!!!!!!!   :







https://tribunecontentagency.com/article/in-war-time-is-less-expensive-than-huma
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" In war, time is less expensive than human life . "





JONAH GOLDBERG SEPTEMBER 13, 2019







" The drama leading up to and surrounding the 18th anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks was an unfortunate distraction. President Trump invited the Taliban to meet at Camp David for “peace talks” — against the wishes of the democratically elected government in Afghanistan and Trump’s own national security adviser, John Bolton. The talks were canceled after a Taliban strike that killed one American. Bolton’s job was canceled when he declined to defend the president’s bad decision to invite the Taliban in the first place.

But behind the shouting there is a serious debate over what we should do about our presence in Afghanistan. One argument for pulling out is less serious than it appears at first blush: The war has gone on too long.

In the world of TV punditry, the claim that this is “America’s longest war” often substitutes for an argument. It’s what people mean when they say that America must stop engaging in “endless wars.” Trump has said, “Great nations do not fight endless wars.”

A pedant might note that history is replete with conflicts that lasted far longer. The Dutch-Sicily war lasted 335 years. Wars between England and France spanned more than seven centuries. The Islamic conquest of Afghanistan itself went on for more than two centuries. In fact, according to an accounting by the Congressional Research Service, America’s longest state of war — in terms of recognized military service — wasn’t with Afghans but with Native Americans. The American Indian Wars lasted from 1817 to 1898.

The more relevant objection is that the length of a war isn’t necessarily the most important metric. This is a point Trump has made himself: “As I’ve said, and I’ll say it any number of times — and this is not using nuclear — we could win that war in a week if we wanted to fight it, but I’m not looking to kill 10 million people.”

That’s an exaggeration, but let’s assume Trump is correct. Most reasonable people can see how saving time at the expense of near-genocidal bloodshed isn’t a desirable trade-off. Time is by no means a costless resource, but given the alternatives, it’s often the best choice.

In a sense, we’ve been in a state of war with North Korea for nearly 70 years. We never signed a peace treaty, and we left troops on the Korean Peninsula to enforce an armistice. In terms of time, that’s a big expense, but it’s cheap when measured in the more important currency of human life. Similarly, the Cold War was not simply a metaphorical war. We spent American blood and treasure for nearly half a century containing the Soviet Union around the globe. But we opted not to have a direct confrontation because we thought biding our time was a better alternative than a direct confrontation costing millions of lives.

In other words: Does it really matter how long the war in Afghanistan has gone on if it’s still necessary to be there? If it’s necessary, time is irrelevant. And if it’s unnecessary, time is also irrelevant.

Imagine firefighters spending months battling an inferno in Yellowstone. At what point would you say, “This has gone on too long, it’s time to call it quits”?

If you have cancer, you might stop receiving treatment if there’s no hope. But, “You’ve been fighting cancer for a long time now, let’s end this endless war” isn’t a great argument absent other considerations.

Many compare Afghanistan to the Vietnam War, which until recently held the title of America’s longest war. And the comparison has some merit in terms of the mission creep, local corruption and the political dilemma of pulling out of a war without a clear victor (though American fatalities in Afghanistan have been a fraction of what they were in Vietnam). The major difference is that there was little chance of the North Vietnamese using their victory to mount attacks on the American homeland.

The Taliban has never recognized the legitimacy of the Afghan government, and it has never truly separated from al-Qaeda — in part because the two groups are politically, economically and ideologically intertwined. Even if it were to break with al-Qaeda, there’s the vexing problem that the Taliban can’t be trusted.

Fully pulling out of Afghanistan would solve one problem: our understandable impatience with a war. But it wouldn’t solve the problem that prompted us to send troops there in the first place: the Taliban’s capacity to harbor and support terrorists bent on killing Americans.

Problems without solutions aren’t problems; they’re facts, even if you put a clock on them. "

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<   ------------   Edith  ,   I am No  "  Bettin' Man  "  ,  No High Roller ,  No  Gambler nor a " Mr. Vegas  "  (  .... although that new Raiders' Stadium is looking absolutely SPECTACULAR )  ,  but I would bet anyone on this board a Diet Coke that Hillary Clinton makes a 2020 Democratic Nomination Play sometime next spring / summer   ..... and The Great President Donald J. Trump ( " SUPREME  " Leader ! )  is smart enough to realize this could very well happen  ............................ she wants a Rematch   .. BAD !   .... No way she lets anyone else steal her DEM Thunder  .  :










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https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1893358&page=85






https://www.nytco.com/press/nicole-hong-joining-metro/


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Reply #4517 - Sep 16th, 2019 at 9:19pm
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< ------------  GIMMEKEEF   ?!   .......... !!!!!!!!!!!!  :







https://www.arcamax.com/politics/mod/davidignatius/s-2274156






" Dunford was a steady hand during Trump-era turmoil .  "



David Ignatius on Sep 13, 2019









" WASHINGTON -- Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who will retire this month, is that rare senior official in Donald Trump's Washington whose career and reputation don't seem to have been tarnished by his dealings with the president.

The explanation is simple: The low-key, Boston-Irish Marine maintained the distance and discipline of a professional military officer. He didn't try to be Trump's friend or confidant, and he stayed away from palace intrigue. The White House treated him with respect, and his fellow commanders came to regard him with something approaching awe: "We'd all like to be Joe Dunford," says one four-star general.

In the ceaseless turmoil of the Trump administration, Dunford has been a steady hand who helped insulate national-security policy from disruption and political pressure. His Pentagon colleagues say he will be keenly missed -- several described him as the best chairman in recent decades -- and that they are hoping that Gen. Mark Milley, his successor, can sustain the independence and cool judgment that defined Dunford's tenure.

Dunford doesn't like talking about his relationship with the White House. The closest he has come was probably a Pentagon press briefing last month: "I've worked very hard to remain apolitical and not make political judgments. ... I work very hard to provide military advice ... and make sure that our men and women in uniform have the wherewithal to do their job."

"Joe Dunford is a man for all seasons," says Jim Mattis, the former secretary of defense and a fellow Marine. "Joe has a quiet mind, not easily distracted; he quantifies things, but he brings in the nonquantifiable. Still waters run deep in him. You simply can't shake his faith in his fundamental values."

Mattis cites two combat anecdotes to explain Dunford's unflappable style. In March 2003, on the eve of the invasion of Iraq, Mattis told Dunford that because of a last-minute change of plans, his regiment had to move out in five hours, rather than at dawn the next morning. "He just took it in stride," says Mattis.

A few days later, Dunford's unit had fought its way to the Tigris River, with the loss of some Marines, and was ready to seize a strategic bridge. Mattis told him he had to fall back until conditions were safer for the assault. Dunford obeyed that painful retreat order without hesitation, Mattis says.

Dunford was born for the job. The son of a Marine who fought at Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War, he grew up in Quincy, Massachusetts, a working-class suburb of Boston. Colleagues say he retained those grounded values throughout a rapidly rising career.

Gen. Frank McKenzie, the Centcom commander and another fellow Marine, remembers that Dunford faced a delicate problem as a young lieutenant colonel on the staff of the Marine commandant. He had to manage a popular but misplaced protocol officer. He promptly removed the officer, to the consternation of some of politically powerful friends.

Dunford's dream was probably to become Marine commandant himself, and after he was appointed to that post in 2014, friends say he assumed it was his last post. When President Barack Obama nominated him chairman in 2015, "he took the job with a Catholic sense of guilt" to do his duty, says one friend.

On Dunford's desk as chairman, he placed the admonition of a venerated predecessor, Gen. Omar Bradley, who cautioned his staff that they didn't have the "luxury" of focusing on just one theater but needed to think globally. Dunford has prodded the different services and combatant commands to do just that -- move toward integrated global strategy, rather than separate fiefdoms.

Dunford built a powerful joint staff to coordinate policy, directed by strong officers like McKenzie and Adm. Michael Gilday, the new chief of naval operations. The joint staff's importance grew as the interagency process of the National Security Council decayed. Some grouse that the joint staff is now too powerful, but it helped fill a dangerous vacuum.

In dealing with Trump, Dunford's friends say his model was Gen. George C. Marshall, the celebrated wartime chief of staff to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Marshall didn't try to be FDR's pal, or laugh at his jokes, or join his social gatherings. Marshall simply did his job.

One four-star general recalls that Trump would sometimes ask Dunford if he liked a particular policy option. "I'm not in love with any of them," Dunford would answer. "My job is to give you choices."

It's Dunford's legacy that in a time of national tumult and division, the military seems to have remained steady as a rock. "









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Reply #4518 - Sep 19th, 2019 at 9:35pm
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<  ----------- Some Guy   ?!  ..... !!!!!!!!!!!!!    " Politics Ain't Bean Bag !!!!!  "   .......... It is ROUGH  :







https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-defends-conversation-with-ukraine-leader-1156...








" Trump Repeatedly Pressed Ukraine President to Investigate Biden’s Son . "

" U.S. president didn’t mention foreign aid on July call with Volodymyr Zelensky .  "

By Alan Cullison, Rebecca Ballhaus and Dustin Volz
Updated Sept. 20, 2019 3:59 pm ET





" President Trump in a July phone call repeatedly pressured the president of Ukraine to investigate Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden ’s son, urging Volodymyr Zelensky about eight times to work with Rudy Giuliani, his personal lawyer, on a probe, according to people familiar with the matter.

“He told him that he should work with [Mr. Giuliani] on Biden, and that people in Washington wanted to know” whether allegations were true or not, one of the people said. Mr. Trump didn’t mention a provision of foreign aid to Ukraine on the call, said this person, who didn’t believe Mr. Trump offered the Ukrainian president any quid-pro-quo for his cooperation on any investigation.

Mr. Giuliani in June and August met with top Ukrainian officials about the prospect of an investigation, he said in an interview. The Trump lawyer has suggested Mr. Biden as vice president worked to shield from investigation a Ukrainian gas company with ties to his son, Hunter Biden. A Ukrainian official earlier this year said he had no evidence of wrongdoing by Mr. Biden or his son.

After the July call between the two presidents, the Ukrainian government said Mr. Trump had congratulated the new president on his election and expressed hope that his government would push ahead with investigations and corruption probes that had stymied relations between the two countries.

The White House declined to comment. The Biden campaign didn’t respond to a request for comment. Last week, a Biden campaign spokesman said of Mr. Giuliani’s efforts to pressure Ukraine: “This is beneath us as Americans.”

Mr. Trump on Friday defended his July call with Mr. Zelensky as “totally appropriate” but declined to say whether he had asked the Ukrainian leader to investigate Mr. Biden, a former U.S. vice president. “It doesn’t matter what I discussed,” he said.

At the same time, he reiterated his call for an investigation into Mr. Biden’s effort as vice president to oust Ukraine’s prosecutor general. “Somebody ought to look into that," he told reporters.

In recent months, Mr. Giuliani has mounted an extensive effort to pressure Ukraine to do so. He told The Wall Street Journal he met with an official from the Ukrainian prosecutor general’s office in June in Paris, and met with Andriy Yermak, a top aide to Mr. Zelensky in Madrid in August. Mr. Giuliani told the Journal earlier this month that Mr. Yermak assured him the Ukrainian government would “get to the bottom” of the Biden matter.

The August meeting came weeks before the Trump administration began reviewing the status of $250 million in foreign aid to Ukraine, which the administration released earlier this month. Mr. Giuliani said he wasn’t aware of the issue with the funds to Ukraine at the time of the meeting.

He said his meeting with Mr. Yermak was set up by the State Department, and said he briefed the department on their conversation later. The State Department had no immediate comment.

The interactions between the president, Mr. Giuliani and Ukraine have come under scrutiny in recent days in the wake of a whistleblower complaint that a person familiar with the matter said involves the president’s communications with a foreign leader. The complaint, which the Washington Post reported centers on Ukraine, has prompted a new standoff between Congress and the executive branch.

Separately, lawmakers have been investigating whether the president or his lawyer sought to pressure the Ukrainian government to pursue probes in an effort to benefit Mr. Trump’s re-election bid.
Mr. Trump is to meet with Mr. Zelensky in person for the first time next week, during the annual United Nations General Assembly gathering in New York.

Michael Atkinson, the Trump-appointed inspector general of the intelligence community, met Thursday morning with the House Intelligence Committee in a closed session to discuss the whistleblower complaint. Mr. Atkinson declined to tell lawmakers the substance of the complaint or whether it involves the president, but he did say it involves more than one episode and is based on a series of events, according to several people who attended or were briefed on the meeting.

Joseph Maguire, a retired Navy vice admiral serving as the acting director of national intelligence, is to appear before both the Senate and House intelligence committees next week about the complaint, though it remains unclear if he will be willing to divulge details about its underlying substance.

Stymied Democrats in Congress continued to mull potential avenues to obtain the complaint. Rep. Adam Schiff (D., Calif.), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said he was considering a lawsuit to obtain the complaint or withholding funding from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

Mr. Schiff has accused Mr. Maguire of violating the law by not sending the complaint to Congress, as required under the federal whistleblower statute.

“It’s been very hard for the director of national intelligence to explain why he is the first ever in that position to withhold an urgent whistleblower complaint from Congress,” Mr. Schiff told reporters.

Mr. Maguire’s office consulted the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel, which determined that the allegation didn’t meet the statutory definition of an “urgent concern” requiring reporting to the intelligence committees, the Justice Department said.

That guidance is binding on the executive branch, legal experts said, and it remains unclear how or whether Mr. Maguire could transmit the complaint to lawmakers now.

Even before the debate over the whistleblower complaint, Democratic lawmakers had begun investigating interactions with Ukraine by the president and his lawyer. Earlier this month, the House Foreign Affairs, Intelligence and Oversight committees sent letters to the White House and State Department seeking records of interactions involving the president and Mr. Giuliani and the Ukrainian government.

Lawmakers are investigating whether there was any connection between the review of foreign aid to Ukraine and the efforts to pressure Kiev to look into Mr. Biden.

In the interview this month, Mr. Giuliani said he had sought in the spring to meet with Mr. Zelensky—at the time Ukraine’s president-elect—and planned a trip to Kiev to pressure the Ukrainian government to pursue two investigations: one into whether Ukraine, under its previous leader, had sought in 2016 to hurt the Trump campaign and bolster his opponent; and another into diplomatic efforts in the country by Mr. Biden, who is currently leading the Democratic presidential field.

Mr. Giuliani ultimately canceled that trip after his plan was made public. Mr. Trump was aware of the planned meeting, he said.

Mr. Giuliani’s criticism of Mr. Biden centers on the then-vice president’s efforts to seek the ouster of former Ukrainian prosecutor general Viktor Shokin, who had investigated a private Ukrainian gas company, Burisma Group, of which Hunter Biden was a board member.

Mr. Giuliani has accused Mr. Biden of acting to protect his son, a lawyer who has been involved in several investment and consulting firms, even though Mr. Shokin had already completed his investigation of Burisma Group before he left office.

Mr. Biden has said he sought Mr. Shokin’s ouster because he wasn’t doing enough to investigate corruption. Other countries had also criticized Ukraine for not appropriately addressing the country’s corruption problems.

Yuriy Lutsenko, Ukraine’s prosecutor general at the time, told Bloomberg News in May he had no evidence of wrongdoing by Mr. Biden or his son.

In an interview Thursday evening, Mr. Giuliani said he wasn’t aware whether the whistleblower complaint related to Ukraine. But in a Twitter post later that evening, he defended the possibility that Mr. Trump had urged Mr. Zelensky to investigate his potential campaign opponent.

“A President telling a Pres-elect of a well known corrupt country he better investigate corruption that affects US is doing his job,” Mr. Giuliani wrote.

Mr. Giuliani said earlier this month that Mr. Trump likely would raise the Biden matter with Mr. Zelensky when they meet, saying the matter was “on his mind.” A senior administration official said Friday that the two would discuss how to expand energy cooperation and trade ties.
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Reply #4519 - Sep 24th, 2019 at 8:57pm
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"  .............. young joey , do the democrats have enough votes to CONVICT ?!  .... !!!!!!!!  "    :









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Reply #4520 - Sep 24th, 2019 at 9:03pm
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...
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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4521 - Sep 25th, 2019 at 7:51am
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Joey, what about the impeachment?
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Reply #4522 - Sep 25th, 2019 at 8:12am
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Some Guy wrote on Sep 25th, 2019 at 7:51am:
Joey, what about the impeachment?








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Some Guy  ,   our Great Leader   ------ President Donald J. Trump  ( " PRECIOUS  "  Leader !  )  is about to Win AGAIN   --- No Way The DEMS  (  " THE DIMS !! " ) procure the necessary 67 Votes in the Senate  .   We never get tired of winning    .......   WIN !!!  ...... WIN !!!!   ..... WIN !!!!!!    .............  Drinks are on Young Joey tonight   ...............   25 - 0 - 0  .....  Even Trump's Angels ( Angel Rebecca Davis O'Brien ; Angel Rebecca Ballhaus [ Pronounced :  '  Ball House  '  ] and Angel Nicole Hong )  are smiling  :










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Disco STILL sucks!

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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4523 - Sep 25th, 2019 at 8:52am
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We're gonna see a lot more about Jackass Joe than our President !!
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Politics thread - Enter at your own risk! Warning… Bullcrap inside
Reply #4524 - Sep 25th, 2019 at 9:43am
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Edith Grove wrote on Sep 25th, 2019 at 8:52am:
We're gonna see a lot more about Jackass Joe than our President !!


Rudy is the turd in the punchbowl here. Let's just get the truth out then we can decide who pays the piper. Joe is done anyway....DEM ticket will be Warren/….and.....Mayor Pete...nahh.....maybe two women? can't see that either...
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"Runnin Like A Cat In A Thunderstorm"
 
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