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David Bowie dead at 69 (Read 24,218 times)
Some Guy
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #50 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 12:38pm
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stonedinaustralia wrote on Jan 11th, 2016 at 11:28pm:
A sad day indeed.

As with the Stones impossible to pick one favourite track but this one would have to be in the top five



If any British RO'ers subscribe to The Times website I would be more than  grateful if they could post Charles Shaar Murray's obit. Thanks.

Any comment from Mick or Keith?



Thanks- never heard that... good!
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #51 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 12:51pm
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Prytania remembers David Bowie with 'Labyrinth' screening




...
David Bowie stars in director Jim Henson's 1986 fantasy adventure 'Labyrinth.' (TriStar Pictures) (Photo12 / Polaris)

By Mike Scott, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
on January 12, 2016


The Prytania Theatre this week remembers David Bowie, the actor and rocker who died of cancer on Jan. 10 at the age of 69, with a special installment in its ongoing Late Nite screening series. It tops this week's survey of off-the-beaten-path film events on tap for local movie fans.

Prytania Theatre Late Night screening series: 'Labyrinth' 5339 Prytania St., 504.891.2787. The theater continues its Sunday-night screening series of fan favorites, which this week's doubles as a tribute to David Bowie, who died Sunday (Jan. 10). On tap: director Jim Henson's 1986 fantasy adventure "Labyrinth" (10 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 17), starring Bowie as Jareth the Goblin King, alongside Jennifer Connolly and a cast of creations from Henson's Muppet workshop. Tickets are $10. For details visit the Prytania Theatre website.


http://www.nola.com/movies/index.ssf/2016/01/prytania_remembs_david_bowie_w.html...
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #52 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 2:29pm
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Voodoo Child in Wonderland wrote on Jan 11th, 2016 at 5:08pm:
My favourite song by David







Not sure if you've heard this isolated vocal track, but it will stand your hair on end. Especially the last minute.

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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #53 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 5:07pm
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First fan reveals touching letter from 20-year-old David Bowie





...



THE first US Bowie fan sat down and penned him a letter about his debut album – and he loved it so much he immediately wrote a reply.

Sandra Dodd, a 14-year-old from New Mexico in the US, got hold of a copy of his first album.

She liked it so much that she wrote to him and offered to start a US fan club on his behalf.

Bowie was so happy to receive praise from across the pond that he sent a heartwarming reply talking about how pleased he was that Sandra got in touch.

Nearly 50 years later, Sandra has kept the letter and it remains one of her most prized possessions.

She even photocopies it to share with avid Bowie fans across the globe.


...


Speaking about the the letter, Sandra revealed: “I told him I thought the album was really good. I had lots of albums then, by groups from the U.S and UK.”

She told him that she thought he was as good as The Beatles.

“I knew most albums had one or two good songs and lots of filler. The Beatles never did that. This album hadn’t done it, either,” she added.

Sandra got hold of the album because her uncle was a manager of a local radio station and he had a copy.

Although she was yet to know what a massive sensation the then 20-year-old would become, she decided to send him a letter.

“It was weird and interesting, and I wrote him a letter. I had told him I liked his writing, and the songs were good,” said Sandra.


...

...



“I wish I had kept a copy of what I wrote but I was too young then, to consider it.

“It’s a beautiful piece of writing and a nice bit of history now,” she said.

Sandra said that her friends had no idea who he was.

“I don’t think anyone in the whole country had heard of him,” she said.

But when he took the world by storm shortly after that changed.

“At university, when newer friends would mention him, I would tell them the stories and offer copies of the letter. By then, photocopy machines had improved and were available,” Sandra said.

“Same, as years passed, if I learned someone was a fan of his, I would share the letter,” she added.


...



Sandra also said that she was enamoured that Bowie had taken the time to respond, as mailing something across the Atlantic wasn’t as easy then as it is now,” Sandra said.

“I wrote him at the only address on the album cover, in New York. I guess that was the American publisher or distributor of the album.

“They sent the letter back very sweetly, with the address of his manager. So I mailed it again. And in those days mailing something internationally was a bigger deal than now.”

But Sandra said that the best part about getting a letter from Bowie wasn’t the fact that she now has correspondence from a world-wide star.

“It wasn’t easy to contact him (nor anyone, in the mid-60’s.) It’s hard for young people now to imagine it,” she said.


...



“So the fact that he wrote back to me was great. But when people ask me about that, they’re assuming that I got a letter from someone famous.

“I got a letter from someone who was really excited to have received my letter. That’s the special part.”

Sandra also added that she offered to set up the US fan club because had there already been one, she would have joined.

And although she was the first ever U.S fan to write to Bowie, she never actually met the man himself.

“When he was filming The Man Who Fell To Earth in Madrid, New Mexico, a friend of mine was pressing me to go to the site and introduce myself. I said no,” Sandra said.

“I had already written what I had wanted to say to him. I wasn’t being a giddy fan-girl. I had been impressed by his songs, and by his writing and I had already communicated that and he was generous to share the packet of stuff with me.”


...



“I didn’t want to invade his privacy and film sets don’t just let anyone on. The friend said ‘take the letter and they’ll let you in’. Really, I didn’t want to do that.

“People should give what they want to give and not be harassed or bothered beyond that. He gave us music, movies, lots of interviews.

“I thought he was very nice to write back to me.”

Sandra was sent several photos and also a British newspaper article about Bowie along with the letter.

The letter reads:

“Dear Sandra,
When I called in this, my manager’s office, a few moments ago I was handed my very first American fan letter – and it was from you.
I was so pleased that I had to sit down and type an immediate reply even though Ken is shouting at me to get on with a script he badly needs.
That can wiat (wi-at? That’s a new English word which means wait).

I’ve been waiting for some reaction to the album from American listeners. There were reviews in Billboard and Cash Box, but they were by professional critics and they rarely reflect the opinions of the public.
The critics were very flattering however. They even liked the single “Love You Till Tuesday.” I’ve got a copy of the American album and they’ve printed the picture a little yellow. I’m not really that blonde. I think the picture on the back is more ‘me’.
Hope you like those enclosed.

In answer to your questions, my real name is David Jones and I don’t have to tell you why I changed it. “Nobody’s going to make a monkey out of you” said my manager. My birthday is January 8th and I guess I’m 5’10”. There is a fan club here in England, but if things go well in the States then we’ll have one there I suppose. It’s a little early to even think about it.

I hope one day to get to America. My manager tells me lots about it as he has been many times with other acts he manages. I was watching an old film on TV the other night called “No Down Payment” a great film, but rather depressing if it is a true reflection of The American Way Of LIfe. However, shortly after that they showed a documentary about Robert Frost, the America poet, filmed mainly at his home in Vermont, and that evened the score. I am sure that that is nearer the real America. I made my first movie last week. Just a fifteen minutes short, but it gave me some good experience for a full length deal I have starting in January.

Thank you for being so kind to me and do please write again and let me know some more about yourself.

Yours sincerely,
David Bowie.


http://thestar.ie/only-i-had-heard-of-him-first-fan-reveals-touching-letter-from...
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #54 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 5:16pm
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hmmm.



This is the original version of the Elvis song "Flaming Star". Elvis re-recorded it when the movie was re-titled at the 11th hour.  (It wasnt released until the mid-90s)

If you know the song and the movie, the significance of the title deals with Elvis' character riding off to his offscreen death having seen the ominous Flaming Star (or Black Star) of Death.

There have been a few theories about a deep literary significance to the title of Bowie's final statement to the world,
(see here for a good one :
http://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/bowies-blackstar-reappraised-the-clues-most-o... )

but the connection may very well be as simple as this.

Elvis' character in the movie comes from a bi-racial family (Bowie's marriage is inter-racial).  Both artists were on RCA.  Both share the same birthday (January 8th) - the date on which the Bowie album was released.

Also probably no coincidence that this was the first Bowie album ever not to feature his picture or image on the front cover.
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« Last Edit: Jan 12th, 2016 at 5:59pm by Gazza »  

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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #55 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 5:40pm
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Wembley Arena, 20 June 1986. Prince's Trust Concert.

The only ever live performance of "Dancing in The Street" and off the top of my head, the only time Mick and David shared a stage together.

The show was broadcast on TV in the UK shortly afterwards but both artists didnt give permission for this to be included as they thought it was sub-par.

Its a tad underehearsed, but its still fun and Ive heard a lot worse, to be honest.

Had Rocks Off been around back then, we'd have been commenting on Mick having a serious outbreak of 'Tour Hair'
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« Last Edit: Jan 12th, 2016 at 6:49pm by Gazza »  

"That's All I Got"

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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #56 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 5:48pm
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squiggle wrote on Jan 12th, 2016 at 10:03am:
I first discovered him in my early teens and he's been there - a part of my daily life - pretty much ever since. He was then at his lowest ebb artistically so my initial interest was quite retrospective but the slump became an opportunity to rise again and his work of the new millenium was some of his finest and most profound.

I keep starting to listen to his songs and then stopping because it's too unsettling. It seems bizarre that I'll never hear that voice singing a new song again.

At least we have all the others, and the quantity of great songs he produced is extraordinary. Only a few can match that sort of productivity (the Stones, the Beatles, Serge Gainsbourg) and none surpass it.

But although I'm saddened and confused by this sudden absence the feeling's a little different to the last time the death of a stranger affected me so much. When Syd Barrett died there was the sense of hopes cut short in an unusually cruel way (later made better by the realisation that he'd found peace and even happiness in his later years). Bowie, however, gained pretty much everything he might have wanted, including a happy family life. Although it doesn't make death seem any less unjust it's the best any of us can hope for and I suppose there's some comfort in that.



Lovely first post. I didnt really 'get' the period from the early 90's onwards for quite a while.

It took the long hiatus and absence of new music after 2004 to encourage me to re-discover that period. I'm glad I did - there's some outstanding material from that era - and when he re-emerged in 2013 I was able to embrace that new music completely.  I've been raving about the new record to everyone for the last week (although it does take a few listens) - and yet here I am in light of this week's awful news again having to re-appraise a Bowie album for things I missed.

Yet this time it's on an album that has only been officially available for 4 days.
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"That's All I Got"

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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #57 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 6:01pm
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #58 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 6:06pm
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #59 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 7:06pm
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Some Guy wrote on Jan 12th, 2016 at 12:38pm:
stonedinaustralia wrote on Jan 11th, 2016 at 11:28pm:
A sad day indeed.

As with the Stones impossible to pick one favourite track but this one would have to be in the top five



If any British RO'ers subscribe to The Times website I would be more than  grateful if they could post Charles Shaar Murray's obit. Thanks.

Any comment from Mick or Keith?



Thanks- never heard that... good!


Yes , isn't it. With Jagger reference to boot.
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #60 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 8:07pm
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Gazza wrote on Jan 12th, 2016 at 5:40pm:
The only ever live performance of "Dancing in The Street" and off the top of my head, the only time Mick and David shared a stage together


And with due respect to the late David Bowie, it's not the same to make a video in the studio and performing live, Mick stole the stage, absolutely

Anyways, I hope the band to play something Bowie or this one in the Olé Tour
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #61 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 8:10pm
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polytoxic wrote on Jan 12th, 2016 at 2:29pm:
Voodoo Child in Wonderland wrote on Jan 11th, 2016 at 5:08pm:
My favourite song by David







Not sure if you've heard this isolated vocal track, but it will stand your hair on end. Especially the last minute.



WOW Polytoxic! Thanks, never heard that one, in fact the reason I love that song is that when I heard it first, fresh, just released, I really enjoyed the singing, crude, rude, with energy, fantastic song
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #62 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 8:30pm
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Edith Grove wrote on Jan 12th, 2016 at 5:07pm:
First fan reveals touching letter from 20-year-old David Bowie





...



THE first US Bowie fan sat down and penned him a letter about his debut album – and he loved it so much he immediately wrote a reply.

Sandra Dodd, a 14-year-old from New Mexico in the US, got hold of a copy of his first album.

She liked it so much that she wrote to him and offered to start a US fan club on his behalf.

Bowie was so happy to receive praise from across the pond that he sent a heartwarming reply talking about how pleased he was that Sandra got in touch.

Nearly 50 years later, Sandra has kept the letter and it remains one of her most prized possessions.

She even photocopies it to share with avid Bowie fans across the globe.


...


Speaking about the the letter, Sandra revealed: “I told him I thought the album was really good. I had lots of albums then, by groups from the U.S and UK.”

She told him that she thought he was as good as The Beatles.

“I knew most albums had one or two good songs and lots of filler. The Beatles never did that. This album hadn’t done it, either,” she added.

Sandra got hold of the album because her uncle was a manager of a local radio station and he had a copy.

Although she was yet to know what a massive sensation the then 20-year-old would become, she decided to send him a letter.

“It was weird and interesting, and I wrote him a letter. I had told him I liked his writing, and the songs were good,” said Sandra.


...

...



“I wish I had kept a copy of what I wrote but I was too young then, to consider it.

“It’s a beautiful piece of writing and a nice bit of history now,” she said.

Sandra said that her friends had no idea who he was.

“I don’t think anyone in the whole country had heard of him,” she said.

But when he took the world by storm shortly after that changed.

“At university, when newer friends would mention him, I would tell them the stories and offer copies of the letter. By then, photocopy machines had improved and were available,” Sandra said.

“Same, as years passed, if I learned someone was a fan of his, I would share the letter,” she added.


...



Sandra also said that she was enamoured that Bowie had taken the time to respond, as mailing something across the Atlantic wasn’t as easy then as it is now,” Sandra said.

“I wrote him at the only address on the album cover, in New York. I guess that was the American publisher or distributor of the album.

“They sent the letter back very sweetly, with the address of his manager. So I mailed it again. And in those days mailing something internationally was a bigger deal than now.”

But Sandra said that the best part about getting a letter from Bowie wasn’t the fact that she now has correspondence from a world-wide star.

“It wasn’t easy to contact him (nor anyone, in the mid-60’s.) It’s hard for young people now to imagine it,” she said.


...



“So the fact that he wrote back to me was great. But when people ask me about that, they’re assuming that I got a letter from someone famous.

“I got a letter from someone who was really excited to have received my letter. That’s the special part.”

Sandra also added that she offered to set up the US fan club because had there already been one, she would have joined.

And although she was the first ever U.S fan to write to Bowie, she never actually met the man himself.

“When he was filming The Man Who Fell To Earth in Madrid, New Mexico, a friend of mine was pressing me to go to the site and introduce myself. I said no,” Sandra said.

“I had already written what I had wanted to say to him. I wasn’t being a giddy fan-girl. I had been impressed by his songs, and by his writing and I had already communicated that and he was generous to share the packet of stuff with me.”


...



“I didn’t want to invade his privacy and film sets don’t just let anyone on. The friend said ‘take the letter and they’ll let you in’. Really, I didn’t want to do that.

“People should give what they want to give and not be harassed or bothered beyond that. He gave us music, movies, lots of interviews.

“I thought he was very nice to write back to me.”

Sandra was sent several photos and also a British newspaper article about Bowie along with the letter.

The letter reads:

“Dear Sandra,
When I called in this, my manager’s office, a few moments ago I was handed my very first American fan letter – and it was from you.
I was so pleased that I had to sit down and type an immediate reply even though Ken is shouting at me to get on with a script he badly needs.
That can wiat (wi-at? That’s a new English word which means wait).

I’ve been waiting for some reaction to the album from American listeners. There were reviews in Billboard and Cash Box, but they were by professional critics and they rarely reflect the opinions of the public.
The critics were very flattering however. They even liked the single “Love You Till Tuesday.” I’ve got a copy of the American album and they’ve printed the picture a little yellow. I’m not really that blonde. I think the picture on the back is more ‘me’.
Hope you like those enclosed.

In answer to your questions, my real name is David Jones and I don’t have to tell you why I changed it. “Nobody’s going to make a monkey out of you” said my manager. My birthday is January 8th and I guess I’m 5’10”. There is a fan club here in England, but if things go well in the States then we’ll have one there I suppose. It’s a little early to even think about it.

I hope one day to get to America. My manager tells me lots about it as he has been many times with other acts he manages. I was watching an old film on TV the other night called “No Down Payment” a great film, but rather depressing if it is a true reflection of The American Way Of LIfe. However, shortly after that they showed a documentary about Robert Frost, the America poet, filmed mainly at his home in Vermont, and that evened the score. I am sure that that is nearer the real America. I made my first movie last week. Just a fifteen minutes short, but it gave me some good experience for a full length deal I have starting in January.

Thank you for being so kind to me and do please write again and let me know some more about yourself.

Yours sincerely,
David Bowie.


http://thestar.ie/only-i-had-heard-of-him-first-fan-reveals-touching-letter-from...


Wow!  He actually wrote her an entire letter!  I'm impressed!

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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #63 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 9:59pm
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #64 - Jan 12th, 2016 at 11:16pm
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Anyone know what ever became of ~~aZQb /TaSty FoAM~~?

I had never listened to Bowie before, but about 10-15 years ago over at Lew's joint, she ordered me to go out and procure a copy of ziggy, which i did. didn't like it the first spin....but by about the third time through, it was as if someone turned on a light, and it made perfect sense....like that scene in the wizard of oz when dorothy steps into technicolor for the first time.

not a bowie die hard - i'm only have five or six of his albums - but several of them are as complete an album as exile or abbey road....

which brings back the original question....did ~~ make the transition?
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #65 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 12:22am
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I have to admit, I was never crazy about everything he did, although he had some real gems and his commentary was more interesting to me than the melodies, but this is a wonderful example of his versatility. His impression of Mick is bang on. A good Mick Jagger is very rare, but this is fantastic

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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #66 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 1:46am
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #67 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 1:48am
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #68 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 8:05am
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In David Bowie coverage, the media forgot to mention a major aspect of the rockstar’s life

http://www.cjr.org/criticism/bowie.php
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #69 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 8:42am
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Tom wrote on Jan 13th, 2016 at 8:05am:
In David Bowie coverage, the media forgot to mention a major aspect of the rockstar’s life

http://www.cjr.org/criticism/bowie.php


Being bi myself, yeah, that kind of pisses me off. Some say his sexual orientation was left out to be sensitive to his family's feelings, but why should it need to be? It seems disrespectful to Bowie himself as well as his bisexual fans.
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #70 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 10:24am
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The Story of David Bowie’s Forgotten Debut Single, ‘Liza Jane’


By Dave Swanson January 11, 2016






David Bowie wasn’t even David Bowie yet when he issued his debut single, a stomping R&B rocker called “Liza Jane,” with his band the King Bees on June 5, 1964. Then still using his given name of Davie Jones, Bowie was a mere 17 years old, but as evidenced by the recording, already full of fire and attitude.

Recorded for the Vocalion Pop label, “Liza Jane” is a growling tune that features Bowie on lead vocals as well as sax. Joining Bowie were George Underwood and Roger Bluck on guitars, Bob Allen on drums, and Francis Howard on bass.

The song’s origins date back to 1917, when a song called “Lil’ Liza Jane”‘ was recorded by Earl Fuller as an instrumental. The song was issued by Harry C. Brown a year later, with added vocals. King Bees’ manager Leslie Conn, who also worked for Dick James Music Publishing, made a few changes to update the song and credited it to himself. The flip side was “Louie, Louie Go Home,” a cover of a 1963 single by Paul Revere and the Raiders.

Even with strong promotion, “Liza Jane” failed to chart and quickly faded from the airwaves. In 1978, it was re-released as a single by Vocalion’s parent company, Decca, to capitalize on Bowie’s fame.

By then, Jones had long since ditched the King Bees, had a go at it with the Mannish Boys and then Davy Jones and the Lower Third, before finally going solo. In early 1966, Jones changed his name to David Bowie, but still wouldn’t find commercial success until “Space Oddity” reached No. 5 in the U.K. in 1969.



Read More: The Story of David Bowie's Forgotten Debut Single, 'Liza Jane' | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/david-bowie-liza-jane/?trackback=tsmclip
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #71 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 10:38am
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Great actor too.  He was amazing in Merry Christimas, Mr. Lawrence.  Wish he had done more acting.

Strange guy, but powered through it.  A force of will there.

"We live for just these twenty years
Do we have to die for the fifty more?"

Yikes!  Fucking hell, man.
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"But in terms of what's left of white people, we're still it." - Andrew Moof Oldham
 
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #72 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 1:48pm
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Berliners Call for Street to Be Renamed After David Bowie in Online Petition


Henri Neuendorf, Wednesday, January 13, 2016


...
David Bowie at the Berlin Wall, (1987). Photo: Denis O'Regan/Getty Images.



Following the death of the iconic musician and artist David Bowie, fans and residents of Berlin have started an online petition in an effort to change the name of the street where he lived from Hauptstrasse to David Bowie Strasse. At the time of writing the petition collected 2,992 signatures.

The legendary star shared an apartment with the American musician Iggy Pop in the German capital's district of Schöneberg in the 1970s. During that time, he recorded three albums with Tony Visconti and Brian Eno, and collaborated with Iggy Pop on the record The Idiot (1977) at Berlin's Hansa Studios.

On Monday, Bowie fans flocked to his former address to lay flowers and candles. Berlin Mayor Michael Müller said “He's one of us."

Describing Bowie as “an icon of rock and pop," the petition stated that “there are many Hauptstrassen in Berlin, but there isn't a David Bowie Strasse yet. Hundreds of thousands, even millions of people associate memories with David Bowie's music. This extraordinary artist deserves this special honor in Berlin."


...
Photograph used as the basis for David Bowie's Heroes (1977) album cover
Photo: Masayoshi Sukita/David Bowie Archive



One petitioner, Sarah Sladek, wrote “I signed because I think David Bowie was an outstanding artist who's influence had a lasting effect on the the music and art scene and who influenced the feelings and lives of many people. He was closely associated with Berlin because he lived and worked here; his work was shaped by this city."

Another supporter, Petra Vladi wrote, “I'm signing because Berlin, with its people and uniqueness, was a huge inspiration for David's masterpieces."


...
Fans lay flowers at David Bowie's former Berlin residence at Hauptstrasse 155 in the city's Schöneberg district.
Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images



On Tuesday, district councilor for Tempelhof-Schöneberg Daniel Kruger conceded that renaming Hauptstrasse “wasn't out of the question." However, he hastily added that under current laws important individuals must be deceased for five years before a street can be renamed after them, DW reports.

Affixing a plaque to Bowie's former residence at Hauptstrasse 155 however, was still an option, Kruger said.

Bowie released three albums during his time in Berlin between 1976 and 1978. Low, Heroes, and Lodger later became known as the Berlin Trilogy.

One of Bowie's biggest hits Heroes was inspired by a couple, Visconti and his lover, that the musician spotted embracing by the Berlin Wall that divided East and West Germany.


...
Terry O'Neill, David Bowie – Scissors, 1974 (1974).
Photo: Artnet.



In a different, less likely attempt, Italian fans have launched a petition to bring Bowie back to life. The statement on the change.org petition simply reads: "Letter to God. Say NO to David Bowie dead."

Meanwhile, AFP reports that the Groninger Museum in the northern Netherlands is looking into extending the retrospective on the musician titled "David Bowie Is" after the institution was inundated with more than 18,000 ticket sales since the announcement of his death.

Bowie's last photoshoot was featured on his official website and Instagram account on his birthday, just two days before his death from liver cancer.


https://news.artnet.com/people/berlin-petition-david-bowie-street-406568
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #73 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 2:00pm
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Starbuck,

I was friends with AZQB also, I think she posted on Lew's and here on Rocks off.  I don't know what happened to her, unfortunately.  I used to have her e addy. 

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... &&Government is an association of men who do violence to the rest of us. &&Leo Tolstoy &&
 
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Re: David Bowie dead at 69
Reply #74 - Jan 13th, 2016 at 4:09pm
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Iggy Pop on David Bowie: ‘He Resurrected Me’


By JON PARELESJAN. 13, 2016


...
Iggy Pop, left, and David Bowie, during the tour for Mr. Pop’s 1977 album “The Idiot.” Credit Rex Features, via Associated Press



Iggy Pop, whose solo recording career began with two albums produced by David Bowie, said in an interview this week that he had still not fully processed Mr. Bowie’s death, at 69, on Sunday.

“The friendship was basically that this guy salvaged me from certain professional and maybe personal annihilation — simple as that,” said Mr. Pop, who is 68. “A lot of people were curious about me, but only he was the one who had enough truly in common with me, and who actually really liked what I did and could get on board with it, and who also had decent enough intentions to help me out. He did a good thing.”

He added, “He resurrected me.” Mr. Pop reflected: “He was more of a benefactor than a friend in a way most people think of friendship. He went a bit out of his way to bestow some good karma on me.”

They had lost touch after 2002, when Mr. Bowie hoped to sign Mr. Pop to his new record label — he was under contract elsewhere — and schedule conflicts prevented Mr. Pop from performing at the Meltdown festival in London that Mr. Bowie was curating.

Mr. Pop met Mr. Bowie in 1971, a period of excess when “we were all pretty bad but he was at least viable,” Mr. Pop said. In 1976, Mr. Bowie invited Mr. Pop to travel along with him as a “fly on the wall” on the tour following the release of Mr. Bowie’s album “Station to Station.” Onstage, Mr. Bowie portrayed his Thin White Duke character while flooded in white light.

“He was really disciplined,” Mr. Pop said. “That was at a time when it might be 700 people in Albuquerque, it might be 15,000 at the Garden, it might be 300 people in Zurich, etc. He did a great show every night. I don’t care where it was.”

After the tour, Mr. Bowie produced Mr. Pop’s 1977 solo debut album, “The Idiot,” while traveling in France and Germany and working together on songs — often with Mr. Bowie providing music and perhaps a title and Mr. Pop completing it with melodies and lyrics. “He subsumed my personality, lyrically, on that first album,” Mr. Pop said. He compared Mr. Bowie with the character in George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion” and the musical “My Fair Lady.”

At times, Mr. Pop said, it was like having “Professor Higgins say to you: ‘Young man, please, you are from the Detroit area. I think you should write a song about mass production.” (He did: “Mass Production.”)

Mr. Pop’s “Nightclubbing,” a song on “The Idiot” that reflected postconcert club excursions across Europe with Mr. Bowie, was recorded with a cheap synthesizer and an early drum machine, the only equipment available after a recording session had been packed up. “He said, ‘I can’t put out a record with that,’” Mr. Pop recalled. “I said, ‘But I can.’ And he smiled, and he realized this was a playground for him. I always tried to encourage his worst impulses in those directions. I was a fan.”

When Mr. Bowie moved to Berlin, Mr. Pop occupied a room in Mr. Bowie’s apartment there “over the auto parts store,” he said. The title song for Mr. Pop’s next album, “Lust for Life,” germinated in that apartment.

Mr. Pop and Mr. Bowie, seated on the floor — they had decided chairs were not natural — were waiting for the Armed Forces Network telecast of “Starsky & Hutch.” The network started shows with a call signal that, Mr. Pop said, went “beep beep beep, beep beep beep beep, beep beep beep,” the rhythm, which is also like a Motown beat, that was the foundation for “Lust for Life.” Mr. Pop recalled, “He wrote the [chord] progression on ukulele, and he said, ‘Call it “Lust for Life,” write something up.’”

Mr. Bowie “saw me sometimes, when he wanted to voice it that way, as a modern Beat or a modern Dostoyevsky character or a modern van Gogh,” Mr. Pop said. “But he also knew I’m a hick from the sticks at heart.”

By contrast, Mr. Bowie was “worldly,” Mr. Pop said. “I learned things that I still use today. I met the Beatles and the Stones, and this one and that one, and this actress and this actor and all these powerful people through him. And I watched. And every once in a while, now at least, I’m a little less rustic when I have to deal with those people.”

Mr. Bowie made a point of visiting Mr. Pop’s parents in Detroit, where they were living in a trailer. “He came to my parents’ trailer, and the neighbors were so frightened of the car and the bodyguard they called the police,” Mr. Pop said. “My father’s a very wonderful man, and he said, ‘Thank you for what you’re doing for my son.’ I thought: Shut up, Dad. You’re making me look uncool.”



David Bowie and Iggy Pop on ‘The Dinah Shore Show’ in 1977.


http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/14/arts/music/david-bowie-iggy-pop.html?_r=0
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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