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Day in Rock - Stones related (Read 58,698 times)
Edith Grove
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #175 - Aug 24th, 2015 at 5:18am
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Today in Music History - Aug. 24

The Canadian Press

Mon, 24 Aug 2015



Today in Music History for Aug. 24:

In 1841, cellist Henri Billet, who may well have been the first Russian musician to visit Canada, appeared at the Theatre royal in Quebec City.

In 1860, 250 singers from "The Montreal Musical Union," an orchestra and soloists performed the "Cantata in Honour of the Prince of Wales" on occasion of the prince's visit to Montreal. The work was written by Montreal resident Charles Wugk Sabatier.

In 1956, people waited outside for hours before the opening of London's first rock club, Studio 51.

In 1960, Stevie Wonder was the first musician to reach No. 1 one on the pop and R&B charts with “Fingertips, Part 2” and No. 1 on the album chart with "The 12-Year-Old Genius."

In 1965, "The Rolling Stones" met their future manager, Allen Klein, for the first time at a hotel in London. Less than two years later, he was running "The Stones'" business affairs. In 1969, Klein was hired by "The Beatles" to try to sort the financial mess at their Apple Corps Ltd.

In 1967, "The Beatles" saw the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi lecture for the first time at the Park Lane Hilton Hotel in London. At a private meeting following the lecture, the Maharishi accepted "The Beatles" as his disciples and invited them to a spiritual regeneration which he would conduct two days later in North Wales. "The Beatles," along with "Rolling Stone" Mick Jagger and his girlfriend Marianne Faithfull, attended.

In 1968, three members of "Country Joe and the Fish" were assaulted in a hotel elevator in Chicago by Vietnam veterans, who asked the group, "Don't you like America?" The band was in Chicago to perform for protesters outside the Democratic National Convention.

In 1968, drummer Keith Moon of "The Who" drove a Lincoln into the swimming pool of a hotel in Flint, Mich.

In 1970, the Saskatchewan Centre of the Arts officially opened in Regina. The centre is the home of the Regina Symphony Orchestra.

In 1976, Arista Records announced the signing of British folk-rock singer Al Stewart. He had just had a hit on Columbia with "The Year of the Cat," and the label switch prompted a complicated lawsuit.

In 1978, trumpeter-singer-bandleader Louis Prima died in New Orleans at age 66. He'd been in a coma since brain surgery in 1975. Prima's novelty hits in the 1940s included "Bell-Bottom Trousers" and "Oh, Babe." Prima provided the voice of an orangutan in Disney's 1969 animated feature "The Jungle Book."

In 1979, the new wave group "The Cars" played for 500,000 people in New York's Central Park.

In 1980, Stevie Wonder played a $100-ticket fundraiser at the Roxy Theatre in Los Angeles to raise money for the family of Eula Love, who was killed by police in a dispute over her gas bill.

In 1981, Mark David Chapman was sentenced in New York to 20 years to life in prison for shooting music icon John Lennon to death the previous Dec. 8. Lennon had given Chapman his autograph only hours before the 25-year-old drifter shot him outside Lennon's apartment building on New York's Upper West Side. Lennon's wife, Yoko Ono, was with him when he was killed.

In 1983, Jerry Lee Lewis's wife, Shawn Michelle Stephens, was found dead at their home in Hernando, Miss. An autopsy revealed she died of a methadone overdose.

In 1986, Italy's "La Scala" opera company made its first North American appearance in more than a decade with a performance of Verdi's "I Lombardi" at the Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver. The opera, set in the time of the Crusades, needed the extra space of the Coliseum for its huge sets and action scenes.

In 1988, country singer-songwriter Nat Stuckey, who first hit the country top-10 in 1966 with "Sweet Thang," died in Nashville of lung cancer. He was 54.

In 1989, 6,000 people paid from $75 to $1,500 each to see "The Who" and an all-star cast in "Tommy" at the Universal Amphitheatre in Los Angeles. It was one of two performances of the rock opera during "The Who's" reunion tour.

In 1990, Sinead O'Connor stirred up controversy by demanding that "The Star Spangled Banner" not be played before her show at the Garden State Arts Centre in Holmdel, N.J. The centre banned any further appearances by O'Connor, and several radio stations in New York and New Jersey stopped playing her records.

In 1990, heavy metal group "Judas Priest" was cleared in a $6.2 million civil suit. The lawsuit claimed that subliminal suggestions on their songs led two youths to shoot themselves in 1985.

In 1992, the Vancouver Parks Board cancelled a free concert by Bryan Adams, set for Labour Day, in Stanley Park. The board rejected demands by Adams's manager, Bruce Allen, that a previously-agreed-upon 42,000-person attendance limit be lifted, citing fears of damage to the park. Allen said the move was necessary to overcome potential ticket-scalping and security problems.

In 1995, singer-actor-author Gary Crosby, son of Bing, died in Burbank, Calif., of lung cancer. He was 62. Two duets with his father, "Sam's Song" and "Play a Simple Melody," made a double-sided No. 3 hit in 1950.

In 1998, Grand Ole Opry comedian Jerry Clower died in Nashville following heart bypass surgery. He was 71.

In 1999, renowned classical guitarist Alexandre Lagoya died at age 70.

In 2005, American singer Justin Timberlake accepted an apology and undisclosed damages from the British tabloid newspaper "News of the World" that falsely accused him in a July 2004 article of cheating on girlfriend Cameron Diaz with British model Lucy Clarkson. Clarkson agreed to pay "a sum equal to that which she agreed to receive from the "News of the World" for her story.

In 2008, a float plane piloted by "Barenaked Ladies" frontman Ed Robertson crashed into the woods north of Bancroft, Ont., near Baptiste Lake. Robertson, his wife and two friends survived uninjured.

In 2011, music industry executive Frank Dileo, who managed Michael Jackson's career in the 1980s and returned as his manager in the superstar's final days, died at age 64.

In 2011, Esther Gordy Edwards, who helped build Motown Records alongside her brother Berry Gordy Jr. and led efforts to turn its original Detroit headquarters into a museum, died at age 91.

In 2013, Julie Harris, one of Broadway's most honoured performers, whose roles ranged from the flamboyant Sally Bowles in "I Am a Camera" to the reclusive Emily Dickinson in "The Belle of Amherst," died of congestive heart failure at age 87. She won five Tony awards for best actress in a play and honoured again in 2002 with a sixth Tony, a special lifetime achievement award.


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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #176 - Sep 10th, 2016 at 2:23am
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...
...
September 10th
1963:
While en route to their London apartment in a taxi, John Lennon and Paul McCartney meet Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham, who invites them to his clients' afternoon rehearsal for a show that night at the Ken Colyer Club. There, backstage, John and Paul offer to contribute a song to the group's repertoire; the duo immediately go off into a corner and finish one of Paul's latest ideas, a number called "I Wanna Be Your Man." The Stones get their recorded version out on November 1st, three weeks before the Beatles' version is released on the LP With The Beatles.
"I Wanna Be Your Man" would prove to be an important early hit for the Stones, reaching #12 in the UK.
1964:
Rod Stewart makes his first recording, a cover of Sonny Boy Williamson's "Good Morning, Little Schoolgirl" done with Rod's group the Hoochie Coochie Men. It fails to chart.
1965:
Beatles manager Brian Epstein begins negotiating for a cartoon series on ABC-TV bearing the name and likenesses of the group.
1969:
As part of their latest exhibition, celebrating the anonymity of "Bagism," John Lennon and Yoko Ono sit onstage for five hours in a white bag at London's Institute of Contemporary Arts.
1973:
The Rolling Stones' single "Star Star" is banned by the BBC for its real lyrics, which feature the word "starf*****" sung a dozen times.
http://oldies.about.com/od/oldieshistory/a/september10.htm
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The Core Of The Rolling Stones is Charlie Watts Hi-Hat/The Sunshine Bores The Daylights Out Of Me/And Then We Became Naked/After the Skeet Shoot & Sweet Dreams Mary & #9 11/22/1968 @#500 2/19/2010 @#800 4/09/2011 @#888 10/28/2011 @#1000 2/2/12
 
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Edith Grove
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #177 - Sep 29th, 2016 at 6:01am
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #178 - Oct 2nd, 2016 at 9:45am
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I was recently listening to the Stones version of I Wanna Be Your Man and IMO that was a mistake, it is clearly not Stonsey at all and its terrible. Its much better when the Beatles did it. I remember some interview where MICK said the Beatles "gave them" that song, but why did they do that?
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Edith Grove
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #179 - Apr 14th, 2017 at 4:27pm
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Big day in Rock history:



1963 – The Beatles meet the Rolling Stones after a concert by the latter band in Richmond, England.


1968 – Producer Phil Spector marries Ronnie Bennett of The Ronettes. They divorce in 1974.

1969 – The recording of “The Ballad Of John and Yoko” takes place with just two Beatles, John Lennon & Paul McCartney. Paul plays bass, drums, and piano; John plays guitars and does lead vocals.

1975 – Former Faces guitarist Ronnie Wood is announced as the replacement for the Rolling Stones’ Mick Taylor.


1980 – New Jersey assemblymen Visotcky, McManimon, and Doria introduce a resolution to bestow the title of “New Jersey Pop Music Ambassador to America” on Bruce Springsteen and to declare “‘Born to Run’ as the unofficial theme” of the state. It does not pass. Read more here.

1980 – Gary Numan releases The Touring Principle. It is the first commercially available rock concert home videocassette.

1983 – David  Bowie releases Let’s Dance.


1983 – The Pretenders bass player Pete Farndon dies from a drug overdose. He had been fired from the group on June 14th, 1982 (two days before Pretenders guitarist James Honeyman-Scott was found dead of heart failure). Farndon was in the midst of forming a new band with former Clash drummer Topper Headon when he died.

2014 – Sam Smith releases his debut single, “Stay With Me.”

2016 – At the Fox Theatre in Atlanta, Prince performs his last concert. The last song he ever plays live is “Purple Rain.”
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #180 - Apr 16th, 2017 at 2:11pm
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16th April 1964, The Rolling Stones first album was released in the UK, it went to No.1 two weeks later and stayed on the chart for 40 weeks, with 11 weeks at No.1. The American edition of the LP, with a slightly different track list, came out on London Records on 30 May 1964, subtitled England's Newest Hit Makers, which later became its official title.
https://audioboom.com/posts/5278730-the-rolling-stones-in-mono-part-i?t=0
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #181 - Apr 23rd, 2017 at 10:40am
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ON THIS DATE (46 YEARS AGO)
April 23, 1971 – The Rolling Stones: Sticky Fingers is released.
# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 5/5 (MUST-HAVE!
# allmusic 5/5
# Rolling Stone (see origginal review below)
Sticky Fingers is the ninth British and 11th American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released on April 23, 1971. It topped both the Billboard 200 Top LP's chart (4 weeks) and UK Albums chart (5 weeks). In 2003, Sticky Fingers was listed as #63 on Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.
It is the band's first album of the 1970s and its first release on the band's newly formed label, Rolling Stones Records, after having been contracted since 1963 with Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the US. It is also Mick Taylor's first full-length appearance on a Rolling Stones album, the first Rolling Stones album not to feature any contributions from founding guitarist Brian Jones and the first one on which Mick Jagger is credited with playing guitar.
Although sessions for Sticky Fingers began in earnest in March 1970, The Rolling Stones had recorded at Muscle Shoals Studios in Alabama in December 1969 and "Sister Morphine", cut during Let It Bleed's sessions earlier in March of that year, was held over for this release. Much of the recording for Sticky Fingers was made with The Rolling Stones' mobile studio unit in Stargroves during the summer and autumn of 1970. Early versions of songs that would appear on Exile on Main St. were also rehearsed during these sessions.
With the end of their Decca/London association at hand, The Rolling Stones would finally be free to release their albums (cover art and all) as they pleased. However, their leaving manager Allen Klein dealt the group a major blow when they discovered that they had inadvertently signed over their entire 1960s copyrights to Klein and his company ABKCO, which is how all of their material from 1963's "Come On" to Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert has since come to be released by ABKCO Records. The band would remain incensed with Klein for decades over the act.
When Decca informed The Rolling Stones that they were owed one more single, they cheekily submitted a track called "Cocksucker Blues", which was guaranteed to be refused. Instead, Decca released the two-year-old Beggars Banquet track "Street Fighting Man" while Klein would have dual copyright ownership, with The Rolling Stones, of "Brown Sugar" and "Wild Horses".
"Jimmy Miller made a significant contribution to the band at the time. That was because he had a great set of ears and he was a musician."
~ Charlie Watts
COVER
The album's artwork emphasizes the suggestive innuendo of the Sticky Fingers title, showing a close-up of a jeans-clad male crotch; the cover of the original (vinyl) release featured a working zipper and mock belt buckle that opened to reveal cotton briefs. The vinyl release displayed the band's name and album title along the image of the belt; behind the zipper the white briefs were seemingly rubber stamped in gold with the name of American pop artist Andy Warhol, below which read "THIS PHOTOGRAPH MAY NOT BE--ETC." While the artwork was conceived by Warhol, photography was by Billy Name and design by Craig Braun.
The cover photo of Joe Dallesandro's crotch clad in tight blue jeans, was assumed by many fans to be an image of Mick Jagger, however the people actually involved at the time of the photo shoot claim that Warhol had several different men photographed (Jagger was not among them) and never revealed which shots he used. Among the candidates, Jed Johnson, Warhol's lover at the time, denied it was his likeness, although his twin brother Jay is a possibility. Those closest to the shoot, and subsequent design, name Factory artist and designer Corey Tippin as the likeliest candidate. After retailers complained that the zipper was causing damage to the vinyl (from stacked shipments of the record), the zipper was "unzipped" slightly to the middle of the record, where damage would be minimized.
The album features the first usage of the band's "tongue & lips" logo, which was originally designed by Ernie Cefalu. Although Ernie's version was used for much of the merchandising and was the design originally shown to the band by Craig Braun, the design used for the album was illustrated by John Pasche.
In 2003, the TV network VH1 named Sticky Fingers the "No. 1 Greatest Album Cover" of all time.
ORIGINAL ROLLING STONE REVIEW
(Note: Review includes BETWEEN THE BUTTONS)
SIDE ONE
"Brown Sugar:" It begins with some magical raunch chords on the right channel. In the tradition of great guitar intros ("All Day and All of the Night," "Nineteenth Nervous Breakdown," and "Satisfaction" itself) it transfixes you: instant recognition, instant connection. Suddenly the electric guitar is joined by an acoustic guitar on the left channel, an acoustic that is merely strumming the chords that the electric is spitting out with such fury. It washes over the electric to no apparent purpose, stripping it momentarily of its authority and intensity. and so, in the first 15 seconds of the albums first cut we are presented with its major conflict: driving, intense, wide-open rock versus a controlled and manipulative musical conception determined to fill every whole and touch every base.
As soon as the voices come on, the acoustic recedes into inaudibility: on "Brown Sugar" wide open rock wins by a hair, but it is a hollow victory. Opening cuts on Stones albums have always been special, fro the early ones - "Not Fade Away," "Round and Round," and "Everybody Needs Somebody to Love: - with their promise of rock and roll to come, to the tour de force openings of the later albums - "Symphony for the Devil" and "Gimme Shelter" - which served as overwhelming entrances into a more complex musical world view.
At their best these opening cuts were statements of themes that transcended both the theme itself and the music that was to follow. As I listened to "Sticky Fingers," for the first time I thought "Brown Sugar" was good, but not that good. I certainly hoped it wasn't the best thing on the album. As it turns out, there are a few moments that surpass it but it still sets the tone for the album perfectly: middle-level Rolling Stones competence. The lowpoints aren't that low, but the high points, with one exception, aren't that high.
As to the performance itself, the chords, harmony, and song are powerful stuff. The instrumentation however, is too diffuse, occasionally undermining the vocals instead of supporting them. But when Richards joins Jagger for the last chorus they finally make it home free.
"Sway:" Vaguely reminiscent of "Stray Cat Blues" but not nearly so powerful. The sound is characteristic Rolling Stones messiness enhanced by the unusual degree of separation in the mix. Charlie Watts bashes away with the smirking abandon that made him such a delight on songs like "Get Off My Cloud" and "All Sold Out." But unlike early Stones messiness, "Sway" lacks intensity. It never reaches a goal because it doesn't seem to have one. Rather, it remains a series of riffs whose lack of content is obscured by prolonged and indifferent guitar semi-solos and a fine string arrangement that suddenly enters towards the end.
"Wild Horses:" A good song with lots of good things in it that doesn't quite come off. The acoustic 12-string stands out over everything else in the arrangement - perhaps a little too far out, as the rest of the instruments sound like mere fragments, wandering in and out of the track at arbitrary intervals.
Jagger's vocal is clearly audible for the first time on the album and I don't care for it. It is mannered, striving for intensity without being wholly convincing. Musically, the more complex the Stones get the m ore inadequate he sometimes sounds. The man is a stylist as opposed to a singer. He has always lacked power and range: on 15 albums he has never really grabbed hold of a note and let it ring. At his best, he sings around the notes - plays with them - dancing in and out with precision.
Or, he can let himself go entirely, with no attempt at stylistic posturing and thereby achieving an almost incredibly naturalism. But, on "Wild Horses," there is a pint in which the only thing that will work is a good note, well sung, sustained and sufficient to stand on its own. It is not to be found. A musical attitude is not a replacement for a musical style and style is not a replacement for essential technique, which is what is missing here.
The longing of the song's lyrics coupled with its ultimate hope constitute as much of a theme a there is on this record. Typically (since "Between the Buttons") the Stones' statement alternates between aggressive sexuality and warmer, more subtly erotic statements of emotional dependence and openness. The flirtation with social significance of the last two albums has been almost wholly abandoned in what appears to be something of a recommitment to more personal subject matter.
"Can't You Hear Me Knocking:" Years ago, when I first heard that the Stones had recorded something 11 minutes long, I couldn't wait to get my hands on it, thinking it was sure to be the definitive rave-up and hoping it would finally put the Yardbirds and Them in their place. When I finally heard "Going Home" I realized the Stones couldn't conceive of a long cut as anything but a vehicle for Jagger to project through. Given the time to stretch out, they went for the mellow down easy side with the emphasis on the voice rather than the instruments.
Now they have done something with a long instrumental break in it and it ain't bad. On the other hand, I can't see what it really has to do with the Rolling Stones. The song is good but once into the solos there is a touch of R&B, a touch of Santana, but nothing to really identify with. So maybe they had the right idea the first time. For old times sake I do hope that the really boring guitar solo is by Mick Taylor and that those great surging chords in the background are by Keith Richards, the original Sixties rock and roll guitarist, and mast of Chuck Berry music, and the soul of the Rolling Stones.
"You Gotta Move:" Anyway, for the present, Mick Taylor's electric slide guitar is absolutely exquisite. Combined with Richard's fine work on the acoustic they create one of the album's few real moments. Charlie Watts' bass drum holds it together perfectly, while Richard's harmony smoothes off the more outrageous edges of Jagger's lead vocal. In the end, all the pieces fit. A small but important triumph.
SIDE TWO
"Bitch:" Jagger in one of his most popular poses: demonic. here he flaunts naughty words and naughty thoughts as if he still thought they were naughty. The arrangement is straight-ahead. The horns sound great here as they are used primarily for purposes of syncopation and rhythm. The bass and drums - the Rolling Stones bottom that has driven its way through over 200 cuts and which is the true instrumental trademark of the group - burns like a bitch.
"I've Got the Blues:" In the tradition of the earlier R&B Imitations such as "Pain In My Heart," "You Better Move On," "If You Need Me," and best of all their great "That's How Strong My Love Is." However, this is the first time they actually added Stax horns. It's good as far as it goes, but lacks the feeling of the earlier imitations. It all seems pro forma. The worst cut the Rolling Stones ever released was "I've Been Lovin' You Too Long" (which sounds very much like a studio recording even though it showed up on "Got Live I You Want It"). Jagger couldn't sing it. Here he almost sings up a storm, but in the end its the part he didn't sing that stays in mind. Somehow, it isn't complete.
"Sister Morphine:" This was supposed to be stark, intense and realistic. Some hear it that way. I find it lyrically convincing, but labored to the point of being unlistenable musically. Perhaps that is part of the conception: obviously, a song about morphine should not be pleasant to hear. The question is, is the song unpleasant because it makes us uncomfortable emotionally, or simply because it is an awkward and unsuccessful attempt to depict reality through music?
"Dead Flowers:" I suppose somewhere along the line they thought of calling the album "Dead Flowers," which would have justified this cut's presence at some level. Despite its parodistic intentions, the mere thought of the Stones doing straight country music is simply appalling. And they do it so poorly, especially the lead guitar. The cut is ordinary without being either definitive or original.
"Moonlight Mile:" From "Brown Sugar" we had to wait all the way to here to get a masterpiece. The semi-oriental touch seems to heighten the song's intense expression of desire, which is the purest and most engaging emotion present on the record. The sense of personal commitment and emotional spontaneity immediately liberate Jagger's (double-tracked) singing: it's limitations become irrelevant and he rises to the occasion by turning in his best performance on the album - the only thing that compares with his singing of "Gimme Shelter."
There is something soulful here, something deeply felt: "I've got silence on the radio, let the airwaves flow, let the airwaves flow." Paul Buckmaster, Elton John's arranger, does the best job with strings I can remember in a long, long time, while Charlie Watts only goes through the motions of loosening up his style, as he comes down hard on the nearly magical line, "Just about a moonlight mile."
The cut contains that rave-up they never gave us on "Goin Home"; perhaps it is just a filling out of the intensely erotic climax that came towards the end of that song ("Sha-la-la," and all of that). When Jagger finally says "Here we go, now" as Mick Taylor's guitar (Richard is inexplicably absent) falls perfectly into place with a hypnotic chord pattern, it's as if he is taking our hand and is literally going to walk us down his dream road. As the strings push the intensity level constantly upwards and Charlie emphasizes the development with fabulous cymbal crashes, the energy becomes unmistakably erotic - erotic as opposed to merely sexual, erotic in a way that the entire rest of the album is not. The expression of need that dominates so much of the record is transformed from a hostile statement into a plea and a statement of warmth and receptiveness.
This cut really does sway and when Jagger's voice re-enters, it is with none of the forced attempts at style and control present on the rest of the album, but with the kind of abandon that he seems uniquely capable of. And unique is the best word to describe the cut as a whole: after nine songs that hover around the middle, they finally hit the high note and make a statement that is not just original but that could have only come from them.
At least it gives me hope for the future.
AFTER THE BUTTONS
The early Stones were adolescent rockers. They were self-conscious in an obvious and unpretentious way. And they were committed to a musical style that needed no justification because it came so naturally to them. As they grew musically the mere repetition of old rock and blues tunes became increasingly less satisfying. They went from doing other people's material to doing their own. From doing their own, basic rock & roll material they began to strive for a more contemporary feeling and approach at all levels, especially production (first on Between the Buttons and then on Their Satanic Majesties Request). After the failure of Satanic Majesties they went back to rock & roll to recharge themselves, mixed it with contemporary themes and production styles, and come up with Beggar's Banquet and Let It Bleed.
Those two albums are responsible for the Stones' reputation with most of their current audience and comprised the bulk of their material on their tour of America. The darker side of those albums was all but ignored. Where the early Stones had been, if anything, too anarchic and too abandoned, they now became too controlled and manipulative. At their best, on “Gimme Shelter,” they could use the production to break through conventions into pure feeling. But on cuts like “Salt of the Earth” and “You Can't Always Get What You Want” they showed insufficient versatility to handle the demands of production. They plodded instead of rocking, seemingly mired down by their conception of what they were supposed to do rather than being involved with what they wanted to do.
On Sticky Fingers, it doesn't really sound like they are doing what they want to. Play “Brown Sugar” and then play any opening cut from the first five albums. The early ones are sloppy, messy, and vulgar. They are brash and almost ruthless in their energy. And they sound real. By comparison “Brown Sugar,” for all its formal correctness is an artifice. Ultimately they sound detached from it, as they do from all but a few things on Sticky Fingers. The two million hours they joke about spending on this record must have surely resulted from uncertainty about what it was they wanted to hear when they were through. On the other hand, those early records always sounded (whether they were is irrelevant) as if they were recorded in a day, without any overdubbing, comprised mainly of first takes. They reverberated with off the wall spunk and spontaneity.
Obviously the Stones can't go back to that: it would be redundant and incredibly limiting for them. But perhaps they have now gone too far the other way. If Sticky Fingers suffers from any one thing it's its own self-defeating calculating nature. Its moments of openness and feeling are too few: its moments where I know I should be enjoying it but am not, too great.
~ Jon Landau (June 10, 1971)
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #182 - Jun 6th, 2017 at 5:23am
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Almanac: June 6, 2017

Births:
1885 - Gid Tanner (Skillet Lickers) (d. 1960)
1936 - Levi Stubbs (Four Tops) (d. 2008)
1939 - Gary "U.S." Bonds (78)
1942 - Howie Kane (Jay & the Americans) (75)
1942 - Larry Taylor (Canned Heat) (75)
1943 - Joe Stampley (74)
1944 - Edgar Froese (Tangerine Dream) (73)
1944 - Peter Albin (Big Brother & the Holding Company) (73)
1946 - Tony Levin (71)
1947 - Terry Williams (First Edition) (70)
1948 - Richard Sinclair (Caravan) (69)
1949 - Holly Near (68)
1951 - Dwight Twilly (66)
1955 - Curtis Wright (songwriter) (62)
1959 - Jimmy Jam (born James Harris II) (62)
1959 - Bobby Bluebell (Bluebells) (58)
1960 - Steve Vai (57)
1961 - Tom Araya (Slayer) (56)
1961 - Dee C Lee (Style Council) (56)
1964 - Jay Bentley (Bad Religion) (53)
1965 - David Ben White (Brother Beyond) (52)
1966 - Sean Yseult (White Zombie) (51)
1970 - James Shaffer (Korn) (47)
1974 - Uncle Kracker (Matthew Shafer) (43)
1978 - Carl Barât (Libertines, Dirty Pretty Things) (39)
1978 - Jeremy Gara (Arcade Fire) (39)
1987 - Kyle Falconer (The View) (30)

Deaths:
1966 - Claudette Frady-Orbison (wife of Roy Orbison) - Motorcycle accident (25)
1970 - Lonnie Johnson - Complications from being hit by a car while walking, stroke (71)
1976 - Tara Richards (son of Keith Richards and Anita Pallenberg) - Respiratory failure (10-weeks)
1986 - Dick Rowe (the man who didn't sign the Beatles to Decca) - Diabetes
1991 - Stan Getz - Liver cancer (64)
1996 - William Palmer (inventor of magnetic tape recording)
2002 - Robbin Crosby (Ratt) - Heroin overdose (42)
2003 - Dave Rowberry (Animals) - Ulcer hemorrhage (62)
2006 - Billy Preston - Malignant hypertension & kidney disease (59)
2010 - Marvin Isley (Isley Brothers) - Complications of diabetes (56)

On This Day:
1960 - Bing Crosby received a platinum disc representing his 200 millionth record sold.
1960 - Tony Williams left the Platter to go solo.
1968 - The Rolling Stones added new words to Sympathy for the Devil about the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy.
1969 - Rod Stewart signed with Mercury Records.
1970 - Syd Barrett played his first show since leaving Pink Floyd. David Gilmour was on hand to assist.
1971 - John Lennon and Yoko Ono came on stage to jam with Frank Zappa at New York's Fillmore East.
1977 - The very first rock golf tournament under the Fairway to Heaven name is run by the Doobie Brothers.
1977 - Stevie Wonder surprised students at UCLA as a guest lecturer.
1979 - A show that Def Leppard played in Sheffield led to a recording contract with Phonogram Records.
1980 - The movie Urban Cowboy opens. The soundtrack spawned numerous hits from Johnny Lee, Mickey Gilley, Anne Murray and more.
1982 - The Peace Sunday: We Have a Dream concert at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena included Tom Petty, Crosby Stills and Nash, Bob Dylan, Stevie Wonder, Stevie Nicks and Jackson Browne.
1987 - Michael Jackson announced he was breaking from the Jehovah's Witnesses.
1990 - A Florida federal judge rules that the album As Nasty As They Want to Be by 2 Live Crew is obscene.
1994 - Paul Stanley of Kiss and his wife Pamela became the parents of a baby boy.
1997 - Ray Wilson of Stiltskin is announced as the replacement for Phil Collins in Genesis.
2000 - Pat DiNizio of the Smithereens files to run for New Jersey senate.
2000 - Ron Wood of the Rolling Stones checks into rehab to end his alcohol addiction prior to the upcoming Rolling Stones tour.
2003 - The management of Six Flags in Darien Lake, NY invoke a clause that allows them to ban Marilyn Manson from performing during Ozzfest.
2004 - Eric Clapton held his Crossroads Festival in Dallas, TX.
2005 - The band Something Corporate cancels their summer shows when singer Andrew McMahon announces he has leukemia.
2009 - The new Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, TX is christened by George Strait, Reba McEntire, Blake Shelton and Lee Ann Womack.
2012 - Adam Clayton's (U2) personal assistant went on trial for the stealing of 3 million Euros from Clayton
Marriages:
1960 - Eartha Kitt and Bill McDonald
1992 - David Bowie and Iman (repeated vows after determining the first ones may not have been legal)
2004 - Heidi Newfield (Trick Pony) and Bill Johnson
2007 - Melanie Brown (Spice Girls) and Stephen Belafonte

Recorded:
1962 - Love Me Do plus three others - Beatles (their first recording session & the first time they met George Martin))

Released:
1956 - My Prayer - Platters (single)
1960 - Only the Lonely - Roy Orbison (single)
1970 - Third - Soft Machine
1970 - Teach Your Children - Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (single)
1972 - The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars - David Bowie
1972 - Looking Glass - Looking Glass
1974 - I Will Always Love You - Dolly Parton (single)
1975 - Made in the Shade - Rolling Stones
1975 - Metamorphosis - Rolling Stones
1978 - The Cars - Cars
1981 - Juju - Siouxsie & the Banshees
1981 - Talk Talk Talk - Psychedelic Furs
1983 - Allies - Crosby, Stills & Nash
1986 - Storms of Life - Randy Travis
1987 - Band Animals - Heart
1988 - Provision - Scritti Politti
1988 - Sur la Mer - Moody Blues
1989 - World in Motion - Jackson Browne
1989 - In Step - Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble
1995 - Let Your Dim Light Shine - Soul Asylum
2000 - Brutal Planet - Alice Cooper
2005 - X&Y - Coldplay
2006 - Laugh Now, Cry Later - Ice Cube
2006 - It's Alive - New Cars
2006 - The River in Reverse - Elvis Costello & Allen Toussaint

Broadcasts:
1964 - Hollywood Palace - Swingle Singers, Wayne Newton
1966 - Where the Action Is - B.J. Thomas, Knickerbockers
1971 - Ed Sullivan - Gladys Knight & the Pips (the final show of the series)

Number Ones - U.S. Singles:
1964 - Chapel of Love - Dixie Cups (3 weeks)
1987 - You Keep Me Hangin' On - Kim Wilde (1 week)
1998 - The Boy is Mine - Brandy and Monica (13 weeks)
2015 - Bad Blood - Taylor Swift Featuring Kendrick Lamar (1 week)

Number Ones - U.S. Albums:
1953 - The Music of Victor Herbert and Sigmund Romberg - Mantovani (1 week)
1964 - Hello, Dolly! - Original Cast (1 week)
1992 - Totally Krossed Out - Kris Kross (1 week (1 previous week at number 1))
1998 - It's Dark and Hell is Hot - DMX (1 week)
2009 - Relapse - Eminem (2 weeks)
Number Ones - U.S. Country Singles:
1953 - Take These Chains From My Heart - Hank Williams with His Drifting Cowboys (4 weeks*)
1964 - Together Again - Buck Owens (2 weeks)
1970 - Hello Darlin' - Conway Twitty (4 weeks)
1981 - Anywhere There's a Jukebox - Razzy Bailey (1 week)
1987 - I Will Be There - Dan Seals (1 week)
1998 - I Just Want to Dance With You - George Strait (3 weeks)
2009 - Then - Brad Paisley (3 weeks)

Number Ones - U.K. Singles:
1970 - Yellow River - Christie (1 week)
1987 - I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me) - Whitney Houston (2 weeks)
1993 - (I Can't Help) Falling in Love With You - UB40 (2 weeks)
1999 - Everybody's Free (To Wear Sunglasses) - Baz Luhrmann (1 week)
2004 - I Don't Wanna Know - Mario Winans Featuring P Diddy and Enya (2 weeks)
2010 - Gettin' Over You - David Guetta and Chris Willis Featuring Fergie and LMFAO (1 week)

Number Ones - U.K. Albums:
1987 - Live in the City of Light - Simple Minds (1 week)
1992 - Back to Front - Lionel Richie (6 weeks)
1999 - By Request - Boyzone (2 weeks)
2004 - Hopes and Fears - Keane (1 week (2 previous weeks at number 1))
2010 - To The Sea - Jack Johnson (1 week)


http://www.vintagevinylnews.com/2017/06/almanac-june-6-2017.html
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #183 - Jun 7th, 2017 at 5:37am
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June 7, 1963: The Rolling Stones released their debut single, a cover of Chuck Berry's "Come On". The B-side was also a cover tune, Willie Dixon’s "I Want to Be Love"'. The single reached #21 in the UK chart.
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The Rolling Stones ain't just a group, their a way of life-Andrew Loog Oldham.
......[URL=http://s6.photobucket.com/user/merrillm123/media/69inLA.jpg.html]
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #184 - Jun 7th, 2017 at 7:15am
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WOW, today 54 years ago their first release ever

Some weeks later a single with Poison Ivy and Fortune Teller was cancelled by Impact Sound the single even had number DECCA F11742!!

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I only get my rocks off while I'm sleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeping with your girlfriend!!
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #185 - Jun 8th, 2017 at 6:05am
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June 8, 1969: The brilliant but troubled Brian Jones, founding member of The Rolling Stones, announced that he was leaving the band, saying that, musically, he no longer saw “eye to eye” with the rest of the Stones.
In reality, Brian had been fired by Mick and Keith because of his increased drug use and erratic behavior. Emotionally and physically Brian was a mess and was actually contributing very little to band. He would die from an accidental drowning at his home less than a month later....
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The Rolling Stones ain't just a group, their a way of life-Andrew Loog Oldham.
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #186 - Jun 8th, 2017 at 4:53pm
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Lips Sealedsweetcharmedlife wrote on Apr 23rd, 2017 at 10:40am:
ON THIS DATE (46 YEARS AGO)
April 23, 1971 – The Rolling Stones: Sticky Fingers is released.
# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 5/5 (MUST-HAVE!
# allmusic 5/5
# Rolling Stone (see origginal review below)
Sticky Fingers is the ninth British and 11th American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released on April 23, 1971. It topped both the Billboard 200 Top LP's chart (4 weeks) and UK Albums chart (5 weeks). In 2003, Sticky Fingers was listed as #63 on Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.
It is the band's first album of the 1970s and its first release on the band's newly formed label, Rolling Stones Records, after having been contracted since 1963 with Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the US. It is also Mick Taylor's first full-length appearance on a Rolling Stones album, the first Rolling Stones album not to feature any contributions from founding guitarist Brian Jones and the first one on which Mick Jagger is credited with playing guitar.
Although sessions for Sticky Fingers began in earnest in March 1970, The Rolling Stones had recorded at Muscle Shoals Studios in Alabama in December 1969 and "Sister Morphine", cut during Let It Bleed's sessions earlier in March of that year, was held over for this release. Much of the recording for Sticky Fingers was made with The Rolling Stones' mobile studio unit in Stargroves during the summer and autumn of 1970. Early versions of songs that would appear on Exile on Main St. were also rehearsed during these sessions.
With the end of their Decca/London association at hand, The Rolling Stones would finally be free to release their albums (cover art and all) as they pleased. However, their leaving manager Allen Klein dealt the group a major blow when they discovered that they had inadvertently signed over their entire 1960s copyrights to Klein and his company ABKCO, which is how all of their material from 1963's "Come On" to Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert has since come to be released by ABKCO Records. The band would remain incensed with Klein for decades over the act.
When Decca informed The Rolling Stones that they were owed one more single, they cheekily submitted a track called "Cocksucker Blues", which was guaranteed to be refused. Instead, Decca released the two-year-old Beggars Banquet track "Street Fighting Man" while Klein would have dual copyright ownership, with The Rolling Stones, of "Brown Sugar" and "Wild Horses".
"Jimmy Miller made a significant contribution to the band at the time. That was because he had a great set of ears and he was a musician."
~ Charlie Watts
COVER
The album's artwork emphasizes the suggestive innuendo of the Sticky Fingers title, showing a close-up of a jeans-clad male crotch; the cover of the original (vinyl) release featured a working zipper and mock belt buckle that opened to reveal cotton briefs. The vinyl release displayed the band's name and album title along the image of the belt; behind the zipper the white briefs were seemingly rubber stamped in gold with the name of American pop artist Andy Warhol, below which read "THIS PHOTOGRAPH MAY NOT BE--ETC." While the artwork was conceived by Warhol, photography was by Billy Name and design by Craig Braun.
The cover photo of Joe Dallesandro's crotch clad in tight blue jeans, was assumed by many fans to be an image of Mick Jagger, however the people actually involved at the time of the photo shoot claim that Warhol had several different men photographed (Jagger was not among them) and never revealed which shots he used. Among the candidates, Jed Johnson, Warhol's lover at the time, denied it was his likeness, although his twin brother Jay is a possibility. Those closest to the shoot, and subsequent design, name Factory artist and designer Corey Tippin as the likeliest candidate. After retailers complained that the zipper was causing damage to the vinyl (from stacked shipments of the record), the zipper was "unzipped" slightly to the middle of the record, where damage would be minimized.
The album features the first usage of the band's "tongue & lips" logo, which was originally designed by Ernie Cefalu. Although Ernie's version was used for much of the merchandising and was the design originally shown to the band by Craig Braun, the design used for the album was illustrated by John Pasche.
In 2003, the TV network VH1 named Sticky Fingers the "No. 1 Greatest Album Cover" of all time.
ORIGINAL ROLLING STONE REVIEW
(Note: Review includes BETWEEN THE BUTTONS)
SIDE ONE
"Brown Sugar:" It begins with some magical raunch chords on the right channel. In the tradition of great guitar intros ("All Day and All of the Night," "Nineteenth Nervous Breakdown," and "Satisfaction" itself) it transfixes you: instant recognition, instant connection. Suddenly the electric guitar is joined by an acoustic guitar on the left channel, an acoustic that is merely strumming the chords that the electric is spitting out with such fury. It washes over the electric to no apparent purpose, stripping it momentarily of its authority and intensity. and so, in the first 15 seconds of the albums first cut we are presented with its major conflict: driving, intense, wide-open rock versus a controlled and manipulative musical conception determined to fill every whole and touch every base.
As soon as the voices come on, the acoustic recedes into inaudibility: on "Brown Sugar" wide open rock wins by a hair, but it is a hollow victory. Opening cuts on Stones albums have always been special, fro the early ones - "Not Fade Away," "Round and Round," and "Everybody Needs Somebody to Love: - with their promise of rock and roll to come, to the tour de force openings of the later albums - "Symphony for the Devil" and "Gimme Shelter" - which served as overwhelming entrances into a more complex musical world view.
At their best these opening cuts were statements of themes that transcended both the theme itself and the music that was to follow. As I listened to "Sticky Fingers," for the first time I thought "Brown Sugar" was good, but not that good. I certainly hoped it wasn't the best thing on the album. As it turns out, there are a few moments that surpass it but it still sets the tone for the album perfectly: middle-level Rolling Stones competence. The lowpoints aren't that low, but the high points, with one exception, aren't that high.
As to the performance itself, the chords, harmony, and song are powerful stuff. The instrumentation however, is too diffuse, occasionally undermining the vocals instead of supporting them. But when Richards joins Jagger for the last chorus they finally make it home free.
"Sway:" Vaguely reminiscent of "Stray Cat Blues" but not nearly so powerful. The sound is characteristic Rolling Stones messiness enhanced by the unusual degree of separation in the mix. Charlie Watts bashes away with the smirking abandon that made him such a delight on songs like "Get Off My Cloud" and "All Sold Out." But unlike early Stones messiness, "Sway" lacks intensity. It never reaches a goal because it doesn't seem to have one. Rather, it remains a series of riffs whose lack of content is obscured by prolonged and indifferent guitar semi-solos and a fine string arrangement that suddenly enters towards the end.
"Wild Horses:" A good song with lots of good things in it that doesn't quite come off. The acoustic 12-string stands out over everything else in the arrangement - perhaps a little too far out, as the rest of the instruments sound like mere fragments, wandering in and out of the track at arbitrary intervals.
Jagger's vocal is clearly audible for the first time on the album and I don't care for it. It is mannered, striving for intensity without being wholly convincing. Musically, the more complex the Stones get the m ore inadequate he sometimes sounds. The man is a stylist as opposed to a singer. He has always lacked power and range: on 15 albums he has never really grabbed hold of a note and let it ring. At his best, he sings around the notes - plays with them - dancing in and out with precision.
Or, he can let himself go entirely, with no attempt at stylistic posturing and thereby achieving an almost incredibly naturalism. But, on "Wild Horses," there is a pint in which the only thing that will work is a good note, well sung, sustained and sufficient to stand on its own. It is not to be found. A musical attitude is not a replacement for a musical style and style is not a replacement for essential technique, which is what is missing here.
The longing of the song's lyrics coupled with its ultimate hope constitute as much of a theme a there is on this record. Typically (since "Between the Buttons") the Stones' statement alternates between aggressive sexuality and warmer, more subtly erotic statements of emotional dependence and openness. The flirtation with social significance of the last two albums has been almost wholly abandoned in what appears to be something of a recommitment to more personal subject matter.
"Can't You Hear Me Knocking:" Years ago, when I first heard that the Stones had recorded something 11 minutes long, I couldn't wait to get my hands on it, thinking it was sure to be the definitive rave-up and hoping it would finally put the Yardbirds and Them in their place. When I finally heard "Going Home" I realized the Stones couldn't conceive of a long cut as anything but a vehicle for Jagger to project through. Given the time to stretch out, they went for the mellow down easy side with the emphasis on the voice rather than the instruments.
Now they have done something with a long instrumental break in it and it ain't bad. On the other hand, I can't see what it really has to do with the Rolling Stones. The song is good but once into the solos there is a touch of R&B, a touch of Santana, but nothing to really identify with. So maybe they had the right idea the first time. For old times sake I do hope that the really boring guitar solo is by Mick Taylor and that those great surging chords in the background are by Keith Richards, the original Sixties rock and roll guitarist, and mast of Chuck Berry music, and the soul of the Rolling Stones.
"You Gotta Move:" Anyway, for the present, Mick Taylor's electric slide guitar is absolutely exquisite. Combined with Richard's fine work on the acoustic they create one of the album's few real moments. Charlie Watts' bass drum holds it together perfectly, while Richard's harmony smoothes off the more outrageous edges of Jagger's lead vocal. In the end, all the pieces fit. A small but important triumph.
SIDE TWO
"Bitch:" Jagger in one of his most popular poses: demonic. here he flaunts naughty words and naughty thoughts as if he still thought they were naughty. The arrangement is straight-ahead. The horns sound great here as they are used primarily for purposes of syncopation and rhythm. The bass and drums - the Rolling Stones bottom that has driven its way through over 200 cuts and which is the true instrumental trademark of the group - burns like a bitch.
"I've Got the Blues:" In the tradition of the earlier R&B Imitations such as "Pain In My Heart," "You Better Move On," "If You Need Me," and best of all their great "That's How Strong My Love Is." However, this is the first time they actually added Stax horns. It's good as far as it goes, but lacks the feeling of the earlier imitations. It all seems pro forma. The worst cut the Rolling Stones ever released was "I've Been Lovin' You Too Long" (which sounds very much like a studio recording even though it showed up on "Got Live I You Want It"). Jagger couldn't sing it. Here he almost sings up a storm, but in the end its the part he didn't sing that stays in mind. Somehow, it isn't complete.
"Sister Morphine:" This was supposed to be stark, intense and realistic. Some hear it that way. I find it lyrically convincing, but labored to the point of being unlistenable musically. Perhaps that is part of the conception: obviously, a song about morphine should not be pleasant to hear. The question is, is the song unpleasant because it makes us uncomfortable emotionally, or simply because it is an awkward and unsuccessful attempt to depict reality through music?
"Dead Flowers:" I suppose somewhere along the line they thought of calling the album "Dead Flowers," which would have justified this cut's presence at some level. Despite its parodistic intentions, the mere thought of the Stones doing straight country music is simply appalling. And they do it so poorly, especially the lead guitar. The cut is ordinary without being either definitive or original.
"Moonlight Mile:" From "Brown Sugar" we had to wait all the way to here to get a masterpiece. The semi-oriental touch seems to heighten the song's intense expression of desire, which is the purest and most engaging emotion present on the record. The sense of personal commitment and emotional spontaneity immediately liberate Jagger's (double-tracked) singing: it's limitations become irrelevant and he rises to the occasion by turning in his best performance on the album - the only thing that compares with his singing of "Gimme Shelter."
There is something soulful here, something deeply felt: "I've got silence on the radio, let the airwaves flow, let the airwaves flow." Paul Buckmaster, Elton John's arranger, does the best job with strings I can remember in a long, long time, while Charlie Watts only goes through the motions of loosening up his style, as he comes down hard on the nearly magical line, "Just about a moonlight mile."
The cut contains that rave-up they never gave us on "Goin Home"; perhaps it is just a filling out of the intensely erotic climax that came towards the end of that song ("Sha-la-la," and all of that). When Jagger finally says "Here we go, now" as Mick Taylor's guitar (Richard is inexplicably absent) falls perfectly into place with a hypnotic chord pattern, it's as if he is taking our hand and is literally going to walk us down his dream road. As the strings push the intensity level constantly upwards and Charlie emphasizes the development with fabulous cymbal crashes, the energy becomes unmistakably erotic - erotic as opposed to merely sexual, erotic in a way that the entire rest of the album is not. The expression of need that dominates so much of the record is transformed from a hostile statement into a plea and a statement of warmth and receptiveness.
This cut really does sway and when Jagger's voice re-enters, it is with none of the forced attempts at style and control present on the rest of the album, but with the kind of abandon that he seems uniquely capable of. And unique is the best word to describe the cut as a whole: after nine songs that hover around the middle, they finally hit the high note and make a statement that is not just original but that could have only come from them.
At least it gives me hope for the future.
AFTER THE BUTTONS
The early Stones were adolescent rockers. They were self-conscious in an obvious and unpretentious way. And they were committed to a musical style that needed no justification because it came so naturally to them. As they grew musically the mere repetition of old rock and blues tunes became increasingly less satisfying. They went from doing other people's material to doing their own. From doing their own, basic rock & roll material they began to strive for a more contemporary feeling and approach at all levels, especially production (first on Between the Buttons and then on Their Satanic Majesties Request). After the failure of Satanic Majesties they went back to rock & roll to recharge themselves, mixed it with contemporary themes and production styles, and come up with Beggar's Banquet and Let It Bleed.
Those two albums are responsible for the Stones' reputation with most of their current audience and comprised the bulk of their material on their tour of America. The darker side of those albums was all but ignored. Where the early Stones had been, if anything, too anarchic and too abandoned, they now became too controlled and manipulative. At their best, on “Gimme Shelter,” they could use the production to break through conventions into pure feeling. But on cuts like “Salt of the Earth” and “You Can't Always Get What You Want” they showed insufficient versatility to handle the demands of production. They plodded instead of rocking, seemingly mired down by their conception of what they were supposed to do rather than being involved with what they wanted to do.
On Sticky Fingers, it doesn't really sound like they are doing what they want to. Play “Brown Sugar” and then play any opening cut from the first five albums. The early ones are sloppy, messy, and vulgar. They are brash and almost ruthless in their energy. And they sound real. By comparison “Brown Sugar,” for all its formal correctness is an artifice. Ultimately they sound detached from it, as they do from all but a few things on Sticky Fingers. The two million hours they joke about spending on this record must have surely resulted from uncertainty about what it was they wanted to hear when they were through. On the other hand, those early records always sounded (whether they were is irrelevant) as if they were recorded in a day, without any overdubbing, comprised mainly of first takes. They reverberated with off the wall spunk and spontaneity.
Obviously the Stones can't go back to that: it would be redundant and incredibly limiting for them. But perhaps they have now gone too far the other way. If Sticky Fingers suffers from any one thing it's its own self-defeating calculating nature. Its moments of openness and feeling are too few: its moments where I know I should be enjoying it but am not, too great.
~ Jon Landau (June 10, 1971)
Whoah! My eyes are knackered! That was a book in itself. Well done. Smiley Smiley
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
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Today in Music History: The Rolling Stones got no satisfaction


June 12, 2017



...
1964: The Rolling Stones, comprising drummer Charlie Watts, frontman Mick Jagger, guitarists Keith Richards and Brian Jones and bassist Bill Wyman. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)



History Highlight:

Today in 1965, The Rolling Stones released one of the all-time most popular rock tunes, "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction." The song was first played only on pirate radio stations as its lyrics were considered too sexually suggestive but it was later embraced by radio stations and the world as one of the greatest songs of all time. "Satisfaction" was added to the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress in 2006.

Also, Today In:

1957 - Jerry Lee Lewis's "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" was slowly climbing the charts.

1965 - The Supremes scored their fifth consecutive U.S. No. 1 single when "Back In My Arms Again" went to the top of the charts, making them the first American group to accomplish this feat. The song was written and produced by Motown's main production team Holland-Dozier-Holland, and features lead vocals by Diana Ross, background vocals by Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson and all instruments by the Funk Brothers.

1967 - Bob Dylan's first compilation album, Greatest Hits, peaked at No. 10 in the U.S. chart.

1972 - John Lennon and Yoko Ono released the politically oriented double-album Some Time In New York City.

1982 - Bruce Springsteen, James Taylor, Jackson Browne, Linda Ronstadt and Gary "U.S." Bonds all performed for more than 450,000 fans at a rally for nuclear disarmament in New York's Central Park.

1994 - The soundtrack album to the Quentin Tarantino film Pulp Fiction crept into the Billboard Top 50, where it eventually peaked at No. 21. No traditional film score was commissioned for Pulp Fiction; instead, the film contains a mix of rock 'n' roll, surf music, pop and soul. The soundtrack album features songs performed by Urge Overkill, Al Green, Maria McKee, Kool and the Gang, Rick Nelson and Chuck Berry, among others.

2006 - Prince received a Webby Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of his "visionary" use of the Internet; Prince was the first major artist to release an entire album, 1997's Crystal Ball, exclusively online.

2013 - Mumford & Sons bassist Ted Dwane was rushed into hospital to have an operation to remove a blood clot on his brain.

Birthdays:

Reg Presley, lead singer of The Troggs, was born today in 1941.

Brad Delp of Boston was born today in 1951.

Chick Corea is 76.

Junior Brown, known as the Hillbilly Hendrix, is 65.

Bun E. Carlos, drummer for Cheap Trick, is 67.

Highlights for Today in Music History are gathered from This Day in Music, Paul Shaffer's Day in Rock, Song Facts and Wikipedia.


http://www.thecurrent.org/feature/2017/06/05/today-in-music-history-the-supremes...
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #188 - Jun 12th, 2017 at 10:54am
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Satisfaction is pure perfection.
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Devoted Stones fan since time began. SMILE. THE ROLLING STONES ARE HERE.

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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #189 - Jun 13th, 2017 at 8:44am
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This Week in Rock History, June 12 – June 18


Anne Erickson|
06.12.2017
 
This week in rock history brings a plethora of significant events, from the birth of the one and only Paul McCartney to the release of Nirvana's debut Bleach album. Read on for some major events, historic record releases and births and deaths happening June 12 through 18. 

Events

1965 – Sonny and Cher appear on U.S. television for the first time singing "Just You" on ABC-TV's American Bandstand.

1965 – Paul McCartney records “Yesterday,” and a string quartet is added later. The Beatles tune would become the most covered song in music history.

1965 – Bob Dylan records the legendary track “Like a Rolling Stone” in New York City at Columbia Recording Studios.

1967 – The first Monterey International Pop Festival kicks off in Monterey, California, featuring the Who, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix, Otis Redding, Janis Joplin and more.

1969 – The Rolling Stones introduce their new guitarist, Mick Taylor, to the world at a press conference in London’s Hyde Park.

1972 – The Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main Street reaches No. 1 on the charts.


1973 – Grand Funk records "We're An American Band."

1980 – Led Zeppelin start what will mark heir final tour with a gig in Dortmund, Germany.

1996 – Producer George Martin is knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.

2002 – Mick Jagger is knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.
  Oh no! not you again

2009 – At the Bonnaroo festival, Beastie Boys perform together for the final time. Adam Yauch (MCA) is soon diagnosed with cancer.


Releases

Chuck Berry, Chuck Berry is on Top, 1959

Iron Butterfly, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, 1968

Captain Beefheart, Trout Mask Replica, 1969

Grand Funk Railroad, Closer to Home, 1970

Emerson Lake & Palmer, Tarkus, 1971

Roxy Music, Roxy Music, 1972

Joe Walsh, The Smoker You Drink, The Player You Get, 1973

Steve Miller Band, Abracadabra, 1982

Stevie Ray Vaughan, Texas Flood, 1983

Ringo Starr, Old Wave, 1983

Nirvana, Bleach, 1989

Pete Townshend, Psychoderelict, 1993

Alanis Morissette, Jagged Little Pill, 1995

Rush, Clockwork Angels, 2012

Deaths

James Honeyman-Scott – June 16, 1982

Henry Mancini – June 14, 1994

Kristen Pfaff of Hole – June 16, 1994

Rory Gallagher – June 14, 1995

Ella Fitzgerald – June 15, 1996

Karl Mueller of Soul Asylum – June 17, 2005

Bob Bogle of the Ventures – June 14, 2009

Jimmy Dean – June 13, 2010

Clarence Clemons – June 18, 2011

Casey Kasem – June 15, 2014


Births

Junior Walker – June 14, 1931

Waylon Jennings – June 15, 1937

Harry Nilsson – June 15, 1941

Marv Tarplin – June 13, 1941

Paul McCartney – June 18, 1942

Carl Radle of Derek and the Dominos – June 18, 1942

Spooner Oldham – June 14, 1943

Chris Spedding – June 17, 1944

Rod Argent – June 14, 1945

Noddy Holder of Slade – June 15, 1946

Greg Rolie of Santana and Journey – June 17, 1947

Alan White of Yes – June 14, 1949

Bun E. Carlos of Cheap Trick – June 12, 1951

Brad Delp of Boston – June 12, 1951 

Meredith Brooks – June 12, 1951 

Bardi Martin of Candlebox – June 12, 1969

Kenny Wayne Shepherd – June 12, 1977 

Nathan Followill of Kings of Leon – June 16, 1979


http://www.gibson.com/news-lifestyle/features/en-us/this-week-in-rock-history,-j...
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“What rap did that was impressive was to show there are so many tone-deaf people out there,” he says. “All they need is a drum beat and somebody yelling over it and they’re happy. There’s an enormous market for people who can’t tell one note from another.” - Keef
 
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...
L-R: Charlie Watts; Bill Wyman; Mick Jagger; Keith Richards; and Brian Jones who make up the band The Rolling Stones display the top Group of the Year awards presented to them at a Variety Club luncheon at the Savoy Hotel, London, England on Sept. 10, 1964. The London-based group were voted into first place, ahead of the Beatles, in the Melody Maker 'Pop' Poll. (AP Photo/Bob Dear)
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I only get my rocks off while I'm sleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeping with your girlfriend!!
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So gimme just a minute and I'll tell you why
 
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #192 - Oct 13th, 2017 at 12:03pm
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October 13, 1973: "Goats Head Soup" by the Rolling Stones began a four-week at #1 on the Billboard 200 Album Chart. It was the group’s fourth #1 album in the US.
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The Rolling Stones ain't just a group, their a way of life-Andrew Loog Oldham.
......[URL=http://s6.photobucket.com/user/merrillm123/media/69inLA.jpg.html]
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #193 - Oct 14th, 2017 at 6:22am
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October 14, 1996: Eighteen years after it was filmed, "The Rolling Stones' Rock & Roll Circus" was finally released. The 1968 event (put together by the Stones) was comprised of two concerts on a circus stage and included performaces by not only the Stones but The Who, Taj Mahal, Marianne Faithfull and Jethro Tull.
John Lennon also performed "Yer Blues" as part of a supergroup called The Dirty Mac, along with Eric Clapton, Mitch Mitchell and Keith Richards.
The concerts would be the last time that Brian Jones would ever play with the Stones.
The film was originally planned to be shown on BBC TV but Mick and Keith decided not to air it because of what they considered their sub-par performance. It was released in 1996 on DVD and Laserdisk.
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The Rolling Stones ain't just a group, their a way of life-Andrew Loog Oldham.
......[URL=http://s6.photobucket.com/user/merrillm123/media/69inLA.jpg.html]
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Reply #194 - Nov 7th, 2017 at 11:31am
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November 7, 1969: The Rolling Stones kicked off their 6th North American tour at Fort Collins State University in Colorado. This was the band's first US tour with new guitarist Mick Taylor. Also on the bill were Ike and Tina Turner, Chuck Berry and B.B. King.
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The Rolling Stones ain't just a group, their a way of life-Andrew Loog Oldham.
......[URL=http://s6.photobucket.com/user/merrillm123/media/69inLA.jpg.html]
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Re: Day in Rock - Stones related
Reply #195 - Nov 7th, 2017 at 2:19pm
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Heart Of Stone wrote on Oct 14th, 2017 at 6:22am:
October 14, 1996: Eighteen years after it was filmed, "The Rolling Stones' Rock & Roll Circus" was finally released. The 1968 event (put together by the Stones) was comprised of two concerts on a circus stage and included performaces by not only the Stones but The Who, Taj Mahal, Marianne Faithfull and Jethro Tull.
John Lennon also performed "Yer Blues" as part of a supergroup called The Dirty Mac, along with Eric Clapton, Mitch Mitchell and Keith Richards.
The concerts would be the last time that Brian Jones would ever play with the Stones.
The film was originally planned to be shown on BBC TV but Mick and Keith decided not to air it because of what they considered their sub-par performance. It was released in 1996 on DVD and Laserdisk.



having a brian era official release is priceless. and it looks great not to mention all the other extra's
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the doctor wants to give me more injections
 
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Reply #196 - Nov 13th, 2017 at 6:18am
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November 13, 1964: Decca Records released The Rolling Stones' version of "Little Red Rooster". Written by Willie Dixon and previously recorded by Howlin’ Wolf and Sam Cooke, the single was recorded at Chess Studios in Chicago. The single wa s the Stones ' second #1 record in the UK and remains the only time a blues song has ever topped the UK pop chart.
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The Rolling Stones ain't just a group, their a way of life-Andrew Loog Oldham.
......[URL=http://s6.photobucket.com/user/merrillm123/media/69inLA.jpg.html]
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Reply #197 - Nov 21st, 2017 at 8:21am
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Rolling Stones At Hirsch: 52 Years Ago Today [VIDEO]

By Robert J Wright November 20, 2017 7:17 PM
http://710keel.com/rolling-stones-at-hirsch-52-years-ago-today-video/
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I only get my rocks off while I'm sleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeping with your girlfriend!!
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